Last modified on 12 July 2014, at 21:10

urban

See also: Urban

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin urbanus, itself from urbs (city)

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

urban (comparative more urban, superlative most urban)

  1. Related to the (or any) city.
    • 2013 May 10, Audrey Garric, “Urban canopies let nature bloom”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 22, page 30: 
      As towns continue to grow, replanting vegetation has become a form of urban utopia and green roofs are spreading fast. Last year 1m square metres of plant-covered roofing was built in France, as much as in the US, and 10 times more than in Germany, the pioneer in this field. In Paris 22 hectares of roof have been planted, out of a potential total of 80 hectares.
  2. Characteristic of city life.

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Webster's Seventh New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G.&C. Merriam Co., 1967

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

urban

  1. accusative singular of urba

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ʊʁˈbaːn/, [ʊɐ̯ˈbaːn]

AdjectiveEdit

urban (comparative urbaner, superlative am urbansten)

  1. urban

SynonymsEdit

DeclensionEdit

External linksEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ûrbaːn/
  • Hyphenation: ur‧ban

AdjectiveEdit

ȕrbān (definite ȕrbānī, Cyrillic spelling у̏рба̄н)

  1. urban

DeclensionEdit


SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Latin urbānus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

urbán (not comparable)

  1. urban

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit