Last modified on 13 July 2014, at 18:07

FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably ultimately from a derivative of Latin avus, or a related term, possibly a diminutive. Compare Italian avo, avolo. Cf. also archaic Romanian bun (grandfather) (modern bunic), Calabrian and Piedmontese bona ("grandmother").

NounEdit

von m (plural vons)

  1. grandfather

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German von (from), from Old High German fon, fona (from), from Proto-Germanic *afanē, *fanē, *funē (from), compound of *afa ( from Proto-Indo-European *apo, *ap- (from, off)) + *ana ( from Proto-Indo-European *ano (on)). Cognate with Old Saxon fana, fan (from), Old Frisian fon (from), Old English of (from). More at of, on.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

von (+ dative)

  1. from
  2. by
  3. of (belonging to) (often replacing genitive)
    Das Auto von ihm
    The car of him (his car)

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

-s


HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈvon/
  • Hyphenation: von

Etymology 1Edit

This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology.

VerbEdit

von

  1. to pull
  2. to cover
  3. to draw
ConjugationEdit
Derived termsEdit
In expressions
With verb prefixes

Etymology 2Edit

This definition is lacking an etymology or has an incomplete etymology. You can help Wiktionary by giving it a proper etymology.

NounEdit

von

  1. won (currency)

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse ván.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

von f (genitive singular vonar, nominative plural vonir)

  1. hope, expectation

DeclensionEdit


LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

von

  1. rafsi of vo.

RomaniEdit

PronounEdit

von (personal)

  1. they

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Direct loan from German.

PrepositionEdit

von

  1. of; only used in surnames of nobility
    Carl von Linné
    Carl Linnaeus

SynonymsEdit