See also: δεν, δε, and -δε


Ancient GreekEdit


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δέ ‎()

  1. but, and

Usage notesEdit

δέ is a postpositive word: it is never the first word in a sentence. It is usually the second but sometimes also the third or fourth.

It is often used together with μέν ‎(mén).



  • δέ in Liddell & Scott (1940) A Greek–English Lexicon, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • δέ in Liddell & Scott (1889) An Intermediate Greek–English Lexicon, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • δέ in Autenrieth, Georg (1891) A Homeric Dictionary for Schools and Colleges, New York: Harper and Brothers
  • «δέ» in Cunliffe, Richard J. (1924) A Lexicon of the Homeric Dialect: Expanded Edition, Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, published 1963
  • δέ in Slater, William J. (1969) Lexicon to Pindar, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter
  • G1161”, in Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance to the Bible, 1979
  • Woodhouse, S. C. (1910) English-Greek Dictionary: A Vocabulary of the Attic Language[1], London: Routledge & Kegan Paul Limited.