See also: νεός

Ancient Greek

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Proto-Hellenic *néwos (compare Mycenaean Greek 𐀚𐀺 (ne-wo)), from Proto-Indo-European *néwos. Cognates include Old English nīewe (English new), Latin novus, Sanskrit नव (náva), and Avestan 𐬥𐬀𐬎𐬎𐬀 (nauua).

Contrasting the attested feminine form of νέος in Attic, νέᾱ (néā), as well as the word κόρη (kórē) (from Proto-Hellenic *kórwā), we must establish a relative chronology for the Lautgesetze, assuming the digamma from the original form *νέϝος disappeared earlier when between vowels than after liquid and nasal consonants.[1][2] See Attic–Ionic vowel shift.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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νέος (néosm (feminine νέᾱ, neuter νέον); first/second declension

  1. young
  2. (pertaining to young people) youthful
  3. new, fresh
  4. (euphemistic, especially in comparative) unexpected, strange, evil

Declension

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Synonyms

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Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • English: neo-
  • Greek: νέος (néos)

References

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  1. ^ Rix, Helmut (1992). Historische Grammatik des Griechischen. Darmstadt, WBG-Bibliothek.
  2. ^ Sihler, Andrew Littleton (1995). New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin. New York, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Greek

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Etymology

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Learnedly, from Ancient Greek νέος (néos, young), from Proto-Hellenic *néwos, from Proto-Indo-European *néwos. Compare to the inherited Demotic synonym νιος (nios). [1]

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈne.os/
  • Hyphenation: νέ‧ος

Adjective

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νέος (néosm (feminine νέα, neuter νέο)

  1. young, youthful
  2. modern, new

Declension

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References

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  1. ^ νέος”, in Λεξικό της κοινής νεοελληνικής [Dictionary of Standard Modern Greek], Triantafyllidis Foundation, 1998