гражданин

BulgarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Church Slavonic гражданинъ (graždaninŭ), from Proto-Slavic *gorďaninъ. The modern meaning is a calque of French bourgeois.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

гра́жданин (gráždaninm (feminine гра́жданка, related adjective гра́ждански)

  1. townsman, burgher (resident of a town, city)
  2. citizen (legal member of a state)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


RussianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old Church Slavonic гражданинъ (graždaninŭ), from Proto-Slavic *gorďaninъ. Compare native горожа́нин (gorožánin), which was inherited from Old East Slavic. Related to го́род (górod, city).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ɡrəʐdɐˈnʲin]
  • (file)

NounEdit

граждани́н (graždanínm anim (genitive граждани́на, nominative plural гра́ждане, genitive plural гра́ждан, feminine гражда́нка, related adjective гражда́нский)

  1. citizen
  2. national
  3. (formal, law enforcement) sir, mister, Mr. (form of address used by a police officer towards a civilian)

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • Vasmer, Max, “гражданин”, in Etimologičeskij slovarʹ russkovo jazyka [Etymological Dictionary of the Russian Language]‎[1] (in Russian), translated from German and supplemented by Oleg Trubačóv, Moscow: Progress, 1964–1973
  • Vasmer, Max, “горожанин”, in Etimologičeskij slovarʹ russkovo jazyka [Etymological Dictionary of the Russian Language]‎[2] (in Russian), translated from German and supplemented by Oleg Trubačóv, Moscow: Progress, 1964–1973