See also: SIR, Sir, sır, sír, sîr, șir, şîr, şir, and siR

EnglishEdit

 
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Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sir, unstressed form of sire, borrowed from Old French sire (master, sir, lord), from Latin senior (older, elder), from senex (old). Compare signor, señor. Doublet of senior, seignior, seigneur, and sire.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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sir (plural sirs)

  1. A man of a higher rank or position.
  2. A respectful term of address to a man of higher rank or position, particularly:
    • 1991 May 12, "Kidnapped!" Jeeves and Wooster, Series 2, Episode 5:
      Jeeves: Foreign travel often liberates emotions best kept in check, sir. The air of North America is notoriously stimulating in this regard, as witness the regrettable behavior of its inhabitants in 1776.
      B. Wooster: Hm? What happened in 1776, Jeeves?
      Jeeves: I prefer not to dwell on it, if it's convenient to you, sir.
    1. to a knight or other low member of the peerage.
      Just be careful. He gets whingy now if you don't address him as Sir John.
    2. to a superior military officer.
      Sir, yes sir.
      Coordinate term: ma'am
    3. to a teacher.
      Here's my report, sir.
      Coordinate term: miss
  3. A respectful term of address to an adult male (often older), especially if his name or proper title is unknown.
    Excuse me, sir, do you know the way to the art museum?
    Coordinate terms: madam, ma'am, miss

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

sir (third-person singular simple present sirs, present participle sirring, simple past and past participle sirred)

  1. To address (someone) using "sir".
    Sir, yes, sir!
    Don't you sir me, private! I work for a living!
    Coordinate terms: ma'am, mam

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

sir

  1. Alternative form of sire

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish sirid (to traverse, seek). Cognate with Manx shirr.

VerbEdit

sir (past shir, future siridh, verbal noun sireadh, past participle sirte)

  1. seek, search, look for
    Synonym: lorg

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
sir shir
after "an", t-sir
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *syrъ, derived from "sour milk"

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sȉr m (Cyrillic spelling си̏р)

  1. cheese

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *syrъ, derived from "sour milk"

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sȉr m inan

  1. cheese

InflectionEdit

Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. sìr
gen. sing. síra
singular dual plural
nominative sìr síra síri
accusative sìr síra síre
genitive síra sírov sírov
dative síru síroma sírom
locative síru sírih sírih
instrumental sírom síroma síri

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • sir”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

UzbekEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Russian сыр (syr).

NounEdit

sir (plural sirlar)

  1. cheese

Etymology 2Edit

From Arabic سِرّ(sirr).

NounEdit

sir (plural sirlar)

  1. secret

WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English shire.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sir f (plural siroedd)

  1. county, shire

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
sir unchanged unchanged unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “sir”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies


ZayEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate to Silt'e [script needed] (sa:r).

NounEdit

sir

  1. grass

ZazakiEdit

 
garlic

EtymologyEdit

Compare Persian سیر(sir, garlic).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈsiɾ]
  • Hyphenation: sir

NounEdit

sir m

  1. garlic

ReferencesEdit

  • Initial SLLE Survey of the Zway Area by Klaus Wedekind and Charlotte Wedekind