слон

BelarusianEdit

 
Elephant

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *slonъ, possibly a deverbative from Proto-Slavic *sloniti sę (to lean against), relating to а medieval story of а sleeping elephant who leaned against a tree. According to some other sources, it is related to the Turkish arslan (lion).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [sɫon]
  • (file)

NounEdit

слон (slonm animal (genitive слана́, nominative plural сланы́, genitive plural слано́ў)

  1. elephant
  2. (chess) bishop

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit

Chess pieces in Belarusian · ша́хматныя фігу́ры (šáxmatnyja fihúry) (layout · text)
           
каро́ль (karólʹ) ферзь (fjerzʹ) ладдзя́ (laddzjá) слон (slon) конь (konʹ) пе́шка (pjéška)

BulgarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Slavic *slonъ, possibly a deverbative from Proto-Slavic *sloniti sę (to lean against), relating to а medieval story of а sleeping elephant who leaned against a tree. According to some other sources, it is related to the Turkish arslan (lion).

NounEdit

слон (slonm (feminine слони́ца)

  1. elephant (usually a male one)
DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • слон in Rečnik na bǎlgarskija ezik (Institut za bǎlgarski ezik)
  • Todorov T., editor (2010) , “слон²”, in Български етимологичен речник [Bulgarian Etymological Dictionary] (in Bulgarian), volume 7, Sofia: Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, page 113

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Slavic *slonъ (offset).

NounEdit

слон (slonm

  1. (dialectal) shelter, offset (used for protection)
    Synonyms: стряха (strjaha), навес (naves)
  2. (dialectal) pen, sheepfold
    Synonyms: кошара (košara), котец (kotec)
DeclensionEdit

This entry needs an inflection-table template.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Todorov T., editor (2010) , “слон¹”, in Български етимологичен речник [Bulgarian Etymological Dictionary] (in Bulgarian), volume 7, Sofia: Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, page 112

MacedonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *slonъ, possibly a deverbative from Proto-Slavic *sloniti sę (to lean against), relating to а medieval story of а sleeping elephant who leaned against a tree. According to some other sources, it is related to the Turkish arslan (lion).

NounEdit

слон (slonm

  1. elephant

DeclensionEdit


RussianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *slonъ, possibly a deverbative from Proto-Slavic *sloniti sę (to lean against), relating to а medieval story of а sleeping elephant who leaned against a tree. According to some other sources, it is related to the Turkish arslan (lion). (Vasmer 1955: 663, Stachowski 2005: 447)

Vovin (2011) proposes that Slavic slonъ reflects Old Chinese (/*slaŋ/, elephant), an etymology previously suggested by Ivanov (1977: 156–57) albeit with an incorrect Old Chinese reconstruction *sðaŋ. As Vovin notes, contact between Slavic and Old Chinese is out of the question, so the solution might arise from an intermediary source. Ivanov (1977:154) believes that the Chuvash forms слон (slon), сӑлан (sălan, elephant) are Russian loans, with the latter being called into question by Vovin on phonetic grounds. According to him, Russian /o/ (phonetically a diphthong [uo] with a mid-high syllabic element [o]) is unlikely to be borrowed as Chuvash low vowel /a/. The reverse, namely the borrowing of Bulgar slightly labialised /a/ as Slavic /o/ is more than likely. Chuvash сӑлан (sălan, elephant) is exactly the expected outcome of the Old Chinese *slaŋ with the insertion of ⟨ă⟩ breaking the OC initial cluster /sl-/ and typical Bulgar shift of PT *ŋ to /n/. The presence of this word in Chuvash places proto-Bulgar speakers in the vicinity of Northern China no later that first century BCE, because approximately after that date the initial clusters in Old Chinese underwent the process of simplification. [1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

слон (slonm anim (genitive слона́, nominative plural слоны́, genitive plural слоно́в, feminine слони́ха, related adjective слоно́вый)

  1. elephant
  2. (chess) bishop

DeclensionEdit

AbbreviationsEdit

  • (chess piece): С (S)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Diminutive forms

DescendantsEdit

  • Kildin Sami: слонн (slonn)

See alsoEdit

Chess pieces in Russian · ша́хматные фигу́ры (šáxmatnyje figúry) (layout · text)
           
коро́ль (korólʹ) ферзь (ferzʹ) ладья́ (ladʹjá) слон (slon) конь (konʹ) пе́шка (péška)

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *slonъ, possibly a deverbative from Proto-Slavic *sloniti sę (to lean against), relating to а medieval story of а sleeping elephant who leaned against a tree. According to some other sources, it's related to the Turkish arslan (lion).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

сло̏н m (Latin spelling slȍn)

  1. elephant

DeclensionEdit


UkrainianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *slonъ, possibly a deverbative from Proto-Slavic *sloniti sę (to lean against), relating to а medieval story of а sleeping elephant who leaned against a tree. According to some other sources, it's related to the Turkish arslan (lion).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

слон (slonm animal (genitive слона́, nominative plural слони́, genitive plural слоні́в)

  1. elephant
  2. (chess) bishop

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit

Chess pieces in Ukrainian · шахові фігури (šaxovi fihury) (layout · text)
           
король (korolʹ) ферзь (ferzʹ) тура (tura) слон (slon) кінь (kinʹ) пішак (pišak)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Vovin, Alexander (2011) First and second person singular pronouns: a pillar or a pillory of the ‘Altaic’ hypothesis?[1], pages 271–272