See also: 马铃薯

ChineseEdit

bell tied to a horse; sleigh bell; jingle bell potato; yam
trad. (馬鈴薯) 馬鈴
simp. (马铃薯) 马铃

EtymologyEdit

The earliest known attestation in Chinese is found in the Kangxi edition of the Gazetteer of Songxi County (《松溪縣志》), published in 1700, but based on its description, it is improbable that it referred to the potato but, instead, referred to the air potato (Dioscorea bulbifera) (Xiang, 2018). The name probably originally made reference to the way air potatoes look like bells used in the tack for horses.

Alternatively, considering this word is mainly distributed in the South, and that other forms in the area, such as 荷蘭薯荷兰薯 and 番仔番薯, usually include a modifier meaning “foreign”, Suzuki (2013) suggests that 馬鈴马铃 (mǎlíng) may be a variant of 馬來马来 (Mǎlái, “Malay”).

PronunciationEdit


NounEdit

馬鈴薯

  1. potato (Solanum tuberosum)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Lingao: ma⁴ liŋ¹ su⁴
  • Zhuang: majlingzsuz

JapaneseEdit

 
Japanese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ja
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
馬鈴薯 (bareisho): a pile of potatoes.
Kanji in this term

Grade: 2
れい
Grade: S
しょ
Hyōgaiji
on’yomi

EtymologyEdit

Origin unclear. Attributed to noted Edo-period botanist and scholar of Chinese medicine Ono Ranzan (see 小野蘭山) in the late 1700s. May be from Sinitic 馬鈴薯, or may be a Japanese coinage later borrowed into Chinese.

According to one theory, this word is a compound of 馬鈴 (barei, horse bell) +‎ (sho, potato), from the way the potato looks a bit like the bells used in the tack for stage horses.[1] In another theory, 馬鈴 (barei) is an example of ateji for Malay, since potatoes were introduced to Japan via the Dutch East Indies.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

馬鈴薯(ばれいしょ) (bareisho)

  1. potato (Solanum tuberosum)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 1988, 国語大辞典(新装版) (Kokugo Dai Jiten, Revised Edition) (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Shogakukan
  2. ^ 2006, 大辞林 (Daijirin), Third Edition (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Sanseidō, →ISBN