EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English starche, sterche, from Old English *stierċe (stiffness, rigidity, strength), from Proto-West Germanic *starkī (stiffness, rigidity, fortitude, strength), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sterg- (stiff, rigid). Cognate with dialectal Dutch sterk (starch), Middle Low German sterke (strength), German Stärke (strength", also "starch), Swedish stärkelse (starch), Icelandic sterkja (starch). Related to English stark (stiff, strong, vigorous, powerful).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

starch (countable and uncountable, plural starches)

  1. (uncountable) A widely diffused vegetable substance, found especially in seeds, bulbs and tubers, as extracted (e.g. from potatoes, corn, rice, etc.) in the form of a white, glistening, granular or powdery substance, without taste or smell, and giving a very peculiar creaking sound when rubbed between the fingers. It is used as a food, in the production of commercial grape sugar, for stiffening linen in laundries, in making paste, etc.
  2. (nutrition, countable) Carbohydrates, as with grain and potato based foods.
  3. (uncountable) A stiff, formal manner; formality.
  4. (uncountable) Fortitude.
    • 2017, Dean Koontz, The Silent Corner, page 98:
      The thought of the gun in his back put some starch in him. He needed the handrail, and he limped step by step, but he ascended at his full height.
  5. (countable) Any of various starch-like substances used as a laundry stiffener

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VerbEdit

starch (third-person singular simple present starches, present participle starching, simple past and past participle starched)

  1. To apply or treat with laundry starch, to create a hard, smooth surface.
    She starched her blouses.

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

starch (not comparable)

  1. Stiff; precise; rigid.
    • 1713, John Killingbeck, Eighteen sermons on practical subjects
      misrepresenting Sobriety as a Starch and Formal, and Vertue as a Laborious and Slavish thing

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CimbrianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

starch

  1. strong
  2. loud

ReferencesEdit

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien