TranslingualEdit

SymbolEdit

As

  1. (chemistry) Symbol for arsenic.

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

As

  1. plural of A
    She went from getting Cs and Ds to earning straight As.

Usage notesEdit

  • There is some difference of opinion regarding the use of apostrophes in the pluralization of references to letters as symbols. New Fowler's Modern English Usage, after noting that the usage has changed, states on page 602 that "after letters an apostrophe is obligatory." The 15th edition of The Chicago Manual of Style states in paragraph 7.16, "To avoid confusion, lowercase letters ... form the plural with an apostrophe and an s". The Oxford Style Manual on page 116 advocates the use of common sense.

AnagramsEdit


EgyptianEdit

RomanizationEdit

As

  1. Manuel de Codage transliteration of ꜣs.

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -as, -aːs

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin as.

NounEdit

As n (genitive Asses, plural Asse)

  1. as, a unit and a Roman coin
DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • As” in Duden online

Etymology 2Edit

From French as, from Latin as.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

As n (genitive Asses, plural Asse)

  1. ace, a playing card
    • 2007, Martin Schuster & Hans-Dieter Dumpert, Besser lernen, Springer, pg. 153:
      Insgesamt gibt es elf Trumpfkarten. Das sind die vier Buben und die anderen: As, Zehn, König, Dame und die Neun, Acht, Sieben.
      Das Fallen der fremden Trümpfe, nämlich Pik-Bube, Herz-As, Herz-Zehn und Herz-Acht, sollte man sich merken.
DeclensionEdit
Usage notesEdit
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

As n (genitive As, plural As)

  1. (music) A-flat

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • As” in Duden online