See also: bank, Bánk, bänk, and Bänk

EnglishEdit

 Bank, Hampshire on Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Old English banc (bank, hillock, embankment), from Proto-Germanic *bankô.

Proper nounEdit

Bank

  1. A village in the New Forest in Hampshire, England.
  2. (rail transport) A major London Underground station in the City of London, named after the Bank of England and one of the busiest stations on the network (OS grid ref TQ3281)
    • 2019 October 23, Paul Stephen delivers a progress report on London Underground's transformative Bank Station capacity upgrade, Rail, page 68:
      Anybody familiar with the London Underground network will know that Bank Tube station is a place to be avoided - if at all possible - on a weekday morning. Located at the very heart of London's 'Square Mile' financial district, some 70,000 people detrain there during the morning peak, to pass through its gatelines and those at the adjoining station at Monument. A further 50,000 passengers squeeze into the station complex at exactly the same time of day, in order to change between the five lines that pass through it.

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /baŋk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aŋk

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle High German and Old High German banc, bank (height), from Proto-West Germanic *banki, from Proto-Germanic *bankiz. Related to Old Saxon bank.

NounEdit

Bank f (genitive Bank, plural Bänke)

  1. bench (which people sit on); pew
  2. workbench (which things can be set down on)
  3. bank (collection of material in a body of water)
  4. (soccer) substitutes' bench
DeclensionEdit
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Danish: bank

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Italian banco (bench, bank), from the same Old High German word banc, bank (height) as above.

NounEdit

Bank f (genitive Bank, plural Banken)

  1. bank (financial institution)
  2. a facility for storage of a particular thing:
DeclensionEdit
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Some descendants may be via other European languages. All are borrowed.


LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German bank, from Old High German bank.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Bank f (plural Banken)

  1. bank (financial institution)

Pennsylvania GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German bank, from Old High German bank. Compare German Bank, Dutch bank, English bench.

NounEdit

Bank f (plural Benk)

  1. bench
  2. workbench

PlautdietschEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Italian banco, itself from Proto-West Germanic *banki, from Proto-Germanic *bankiz (bulge; bench).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Bank f (plural Banken)

  1. bank