El Niño

See also: El Nino

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish El Niño (literally The Little Boy), referring to the Christ child, as the phenomenon is observed around Christmas time.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

El Niño (plural El Niños)

  1. An invasion of warm water into the surface of the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Peru and Ecuador every four to seven years that causes changes in local and regional climate, associated with a positive anomaly.
    • 2007 May 23, in the Houston Chronicle:
      Additionally, scientists aren’t expecting to be surprised again by El Niño, a warming of the Pacific Ocean that tends to dampen Atlantic hurricane activity.
    • 2020 July 23, Abrahm Lustgarten, “The Great Climate Migration”, in New York Times[1]:
      The odd weather phenomenon that many blame for the suffering here — the drought and sudden storm pattern known as El Niño — is expected to become more frequent as the planet warms.

Coordinate termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish El Niño.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

El Niño m

  1. (meteorology) El Niño

Related termsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish El Niño.

PronunciationEdit

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˌew.ˈni.ɲu/, /ˌel.ˈni.ɲu/, /ˌɛl.ˈni.ɲu/, /ˌɛw.ˈni.ɲu/

Proper nounEdit

El Niño m (plural El Niños)

  1. (meteorology) El Niño (a global coupled ocean-atmosphere phenomenon)

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

El Niño m

  1. the Christ child
  2. (climatology) El Niño (ocean current)

TurkishEdit

Proper nounEdit

El Niño (definite accusative El Niño'yu, plural El Niño'lar)

  1. (meteorology) El Niño (ocean current)