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Wiktionary
Macedonian edition of Wiktionary
 
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Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle English Macedonyen, partly from Macedonia and partly from Latin Macedonius, + -an;[1] equivalent to Macedonia +‎ -an.

Adjective

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Macedonian (not comparable)

  1. Of or pertaining to Macedonia or its people or language.
    Synonym: Macedonic
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Translations
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Noun

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Macedonian (countable and uncountable, plural Macedonians)

  1. (countable) A person from Macedonia (in any sense).
  2. (uncountable) A South Slavic language, the standard language of the Republic of North Macedonia.
  3. (historical) The tongue of the Ancient Macedonians, spoken in Macedon during the 1st millennium BC. (see Ancient Macedonian)
  4. (uncountable) The Greek dialect in Macedonia, region of Greece.
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Translations
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See also
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Further reading

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Etymology 2

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From Middle English Macedonyan, from Latin Macedoniānus,[2] from Macedonius + -ānus, after the Greek bishop Macedonius I of Constantinople.

Adjective

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Macedonian (not comparable)

  1. (historical, Christianity) Pertaining to the Macedonian heresy or to Macedonian heretics.
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Noun

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Macedonian (plural Macedonians)

  1. (historical, Christianity) A member of an anti–Nicene Creed sect founded by the Greek bishop Macedonius I of Constantinople, which flourished in the regions adjacent to the Hellespont during the latter half of the fourth, and the beginning of the fifth centuries.
    • 1575, Martin Luther, translated by “certaine godly learned men”, A Commentarie of M. Doctor Martin Luther vpon the Epistle of S. Paul to the Galathians, [], London: [] Thomas Vautroullier [], folio 16, recto:
      I do therfoꝛe ſo diligently admoniſh you of this thing, becauſe it is daungerous leſt among ſo many errours, and in ſo great varietie and confuſion of ſectes, there might ſtep vp ſome Arrians, Eunomians, Macedonians, and ſuch other heretikes, that might doe harme to the Churches with their ſubteltie.
    • 1915, Friedrich Loofs, “Macedonianism”, in James Hastings, John A[lexander] Selbie, Louis H[erbert] Gray, editors, Encyclopædia of Religion and Ethics, volume VIII (Life and Death–Mulla), Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, []; New York, N.Y.: Charles Scribner’s Sons, [], page 225, column 2:
      With these data at our disposal we are in a position to sketch the teaching of the Macedonians to a great extent from their own writings, []. 3. Doctrine of the Macedonians in the same period.—The leading doctrine of the Macedonians is found in the thesis characterized by their opponents as ‘Pneumatomachian,’ viz. that the Holy Spirit is not to be designated Θεός (frag. 32, lines 1–8, Dial. c. Maced. i. 1 [p. 1292 A]; frag. 29, Did. de Trin. iii. xxxvi. [p. 965 B]).
    • 1996, Maurice Wiles, “[The End of Arianism] Gothic Christianity”, in Archetypal Heresy: Arianism through the Centuries, Oxford, Oxon: Clarendon Press, →ISBN, page 43:
      At least as Auxentius reports him in the covering letter which precedes Ulfila’s confession, he is as vehement in his opposition to what he sees as heretical alternatives to his own form of belief as most other participants in the controversies of the time. Heretics are not Christians but antichrists. Homoousians, Homoiousians, and Macedonians are all included in this blanket condemnation.

Further reading

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References

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  1. ^ Macedonian, n.1 and adj.1”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, launched 2000.
  2. ^ Macedonian, n.2 and adj.2”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, launched 2000.

Anagrams

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