See also: otter

EnglishEdit

 
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Proper nounEdit

Otter

  1. A river with its source in the Blackdown Hills, Somerset, and which flows through Devon, to Lyme Bay in the English Channel.

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old High German otter, from Proto-Germanic *utraz, from Proto-Indo-European *udrós.

NounEdit

Otter m (strong, genitive Otters, plural Otter)

  1. otter
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old High German nātara. Originally the same word as Natter colubrid. The form is based on the common dialectal development -ā--ō- with subsequent irregular shortening. Loss of initial n- is a common development in the Germanic languages and is due to metanalysis, i.e. the unetymological segmentation of preceding endings or articles, for example: *eine notter, dialectally *en notter*en‿otter. The same happened in Dutch adder and English adder. The German form was spread by Luther.

NounEdit

Otter f (genitive Otter, plural Ottern)

  1. adder
  2. viper
Usage notesEdit
  • At least outside of scientific parlance, this word is chiefly restricted to compound words, to avoid confusion with Etymology 1.
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Saterland FrisianEdit

 
n'Otter.

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian *otter, from Proto-West Germanic *ottr. Cognates include West Frisian otter and German Otter.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɔtər/
  • Hyphenation: Ot‧ter

NounEdit

Otter m (plural Ottere)

  1. otter

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Marron C. Fort (2015), “Otter”, in Saterfriesisches Wörterbuch mit einer phonologischen und grammatischen Übersicht, Buske, →ISBN