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See also: wiktionary
For an introduction to the Wiktionary project, see Wiktionary:Welcome, newcomers.

Contents

English

Etymology

 
The English Wiktionary logo. Wiktionary went online on 12 December 2002.

Blend of wiki +‎ dictionary.

Pronunciation

Proper noun

Wiktionary (plural Wiktionaries)

  1. A collaborative project run by the Wikimedia Foundation to produce a free and complete dictionary in every language; the dictionaries, collectively, produced by that project.
    • 2003 May 1, Hamish Mackintosh, “Talk time: William Gibson”, in The Guardian[1], London, archived from the original on 30 June 2016, page 21:
      [Hamish Mackintosh:] So is Google officially a verb now? / [William Gibson:] When I wrote Pattern Recognition, it occurred to me that I could use it as a verb and it also occurred to me that someone might already have done so. I thought it didn't matter too much. If I'm first that's great, but if I'm not, then it's just good reportage in a way. Sites like Wiktionary track new usages and neologisms. The page on Google as a verb went back almost two years!
    • 2008, Phoebe Ayers; Charles Matthews; Ben Yates, “Wikimedia Commons and Other Sister Projects”, in How Wikipedia Works: And How You Can Be a Part of It, San Francisco, Calif.: No Starch Press, ISBN 978-1-59327-176-3, pages 428 and 430:
      [page 428] Wiktionary is a multilingual dictionary (also thesaurus and phrase-book) and has distinctive content policies. Words must be attested and idiomatic (that is, words should be in use, and phrases should be commonly used idioms), and submissions should be neutral and verifiable. [] [page 430] Wiktionary was proposed on the Wikipedia-L mailing list in April 2001 by Larry Sanger, just three months after Wikipedia was launched. [] An outside project called Omegawiki, started by a handful of Wiktionarians, is working on a grand combination of data from Wiktionary into a single dictionary for all languages.
    • 2008, John Broughton, “What Wikipedia is Not”, in Wikipedia Reader’s Guide (The Missing Manual), Sebastopol, Calif.: O'Reilly Media, ISBN 978-0-596-52174-5, page 22:
      Wikipedia has a well-known policy (to experienced editors, at least) stating what kinds of information belong in the encyclopedia. The sister projects that the Wikimedia Foundation supports, such as Wiktionary, fulfill some of the roles that Wikipedia does not. [] Wiktionary is a free, multilingual dictionary with definitions, etymologies, pronunciations, sample quotations, synonyms, antonyms and translations. It's the "lexical companion" to Wikipedia.
    • 2010, Elizabeth Knowles, “[Appendix:] Where to Look: A Selection of Online Resources”, in How to Read a Word, Oxford: Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0-19-957489-6, page 159:
      Collaborative online resources such as Wiktionary may offer a first view of recent coinages which have not yet been included in traditional dictionaries.
    • 2010, Christian M. Meyer; Iryna Gurevych, “Worth Its Weight in Gold or Yet Another Resource – A Comparative Study of Wiktonary, OpenThesaurus and GermaNet”, in Alexander Gelbukh, editor, Computational Linguistics and Intelligent Text Processing: 11th International Conference, CICLing 2010, Iasi, Romania, March 21–27, 2010, Proceedings (Lecture Notes in Computer Science; 6008; LNCS Sublibrary; SL 1 (Theoretical Computer Science and General Issues)), Berlin; Heidelberg; New York, N.Y.: Springer, ISBN 978-3-642-12115-9, page 41:
      The source of a Wiktionary relation is usually associated with a certain word sense. The syntax [2] fish within the article bass, e.g., indicates that the second sense of bass (the fish within the order of Perciformes) is the source of a (hypernymy) relation to the target term fish. Unfortunately, the target of a relation is not sense disambiguated in general, as it is only given by a link to a certain article. For the term fish in the relation above, it is not clear whether the maritime animal, a part of a ship's mast or a card game is meant. Automatic word sense disambiguation is required to determine the correct sense of the target. To our knowledge, this issue has not been addressed in any of the works based on Wiktionary.
    • 2015, Werner Krauß, “Heritage and Climate Change: A Fatal Affair”, in David C. Harvey and Jim Perry, editors, The Future of Heritage as Climates Change: Loss, Adaptation and Creativity (Key Issues in Cultural Heritage), Abingdon, Oxon.; New York, N.Y.: Routledge, ISBN 978-1-138-78183-2, page 54:
      In a letter, Otto Maier called this drawing a "Galimathias"; according to a "wiktionary entry," this is a Greek word that passed from French students to German citizens and signifies something like "nonsense".
  2. A particular version of this dictionary project, written in a certain language, such as the English-language Wiktionary (often known simply as the English Wiktionary).
    • 2008, Phoebe Ayers; Charles Matthews; Ben Yates, “Wikimedia Commons and Other Sister Projects”, in How Wikipedia Works: And How You Can Be a Part of It, San Francisco, Calif.: No Starch Press, ISBN 978-1-59327-176-3, page 430:
      The site was brought online in English on December 12, 2002; on March 29, 2004, the first non-English Wiktionaries were initiated in French and Polish. Wiktionaries in over 200 languages now exist, and more than 100 have more than 100 definitions.

Alternative forms

Descendants

Translations

See also

Further reading


Danish

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology

From English Wiktionary.

Proper noun

Wiktionary

  1. Wiktionary.

Synonyms


German

 
German Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia de

Etymology

Borrowed from English Wiktionary.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈvɪk.(t)ʃəˌnɛ.ʀi/, /-ɹi/
  • IPA(key): /ˈvɪk.(t)ʃənˌʀiː/, /-ˌɹiː/ (probably rare)
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: Wik‧tio‧na‧ry

Proper noun

Wiktionary n (genitive Wiktionarys)

  1. Wiktionary.

Declension

See also


Piedmontese

Proper noun

Wiktionary

  1. Wiktionary

Synonyms