See also: zephyrette

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

zephyr +‎ -ette

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

Zephyrette (plural Zephyrettes)

  1. (historical) An on-board hostess on the California Zephyr train, between 1949 and 1970.
    • 1952, David L. Paden, Problems and Economics of Dining Car Service, page 163:
      The Zephyrette then takes the reservations of the Pullman passengers.
    • 1995, Henry Kisor, Zephyr: Tracking a Dream Across America, page 18:
      A good part of the train's personality lay in the Zephyrette, an on-board factotum who, like an airline stewardess, was a mix of hostess, paramedic, tour guide, secretary, nanny, security guard, purser, public relations agent and ombudswoman.
    • 1997, Mike Schafer & ‎Joe Welsh, Classic American Streamliners, →ISBN, page 68:
      Zephyrettes were a fixture on the CZ right to the last day of service on March 22, 1970.
    • 2009, Sean Phelan, Coming of Age, →ISBN, page 246:
      The two wooly-headed, intellectual-looking twins laughed. “Well, our dad's name was Zechariah and our mom worked as a Zephyrette on the California Zephyr passenger train,” Ezekiel explained.
  2. A lightweight print fabric used for women's dresses.
    • 1908, The Western Fruit-grower, page 266:
      I'm going to select one of those beautiful fast-color Zephyrette patterns for my 'prize' dress.
    • 1921, The Independent - Volume 105, page 147:
      McCutcheon's Stocks of Ginghams, Linens, Shirtings, Novelty Voiles, Zephyrette, Japanese Crepes, and White materials are always abundant and varied.
    • 1953, Industrial Sports - Volume 14, page 6:
      United States Rubber Co. has introduced a lightweight plastic Zephyrette raincoat for women, girls and children.