English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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abduct +‎ -or

Noun

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abductor (plural abductors)

  1. One who abducts; a kidnapper. [mid 19th century][1]
Antonyms
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Derived terms
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Translations
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Etymology 2

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From Medieval Latin abductor, from abdūcō + -tor.

Noun

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abductor (plural abductors or abductores)

  1. (anatomy) A muscle which serves to draw a part out, or from the median line of the body[early 17th century][1]
    the abductor oculi draws the eye outward.
Antonyms
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Translations
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References

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  1. 1.0 1.1 Lesley Brown, editor-in-chief, William R. Trumble and Angus Stevenson, editors (2002), “abductor”, in The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 5th edition, Oxford, New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 3.

Latin

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Etymology

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From abdūcō (I abduct) +‎ -tor.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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abductor m (genitive abductōris); third declension

  1. (Medieval Latin) abductor
    Synonyms: plagiātor, plagiārius

Declension

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Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative abductor abductōrēs
Genitive abductōris abductōrum
Dative abductōrī abductōribus
Accusative abductōrem abductōrēs
Ablative abductōre abductōribus
Vocative abductor abductōrēs

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Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French abducteur.

Adjective

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abductor m or n (feminine singular abductoare, masculine plural abductori, feminine and neuter plural abductoare)

  1. abductive

Declension

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Spanish

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Etymology

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Borrowed from New Latin abductor, from abdūcō + -tor.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /abduɡˈtoɾ/ [aβ̞.ð̞uɣ̞ˈt̪oɾ]
  • Rhymes: -oɾ
  • Syllabification: ab‧duc‧tor

Noun

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abductor m (plural abductores)

  1. (anatomy) abductor

Derived terms

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Further reading

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