aberrate

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aberrātus, perfect passive participle of aberrō (wander, stray or deviate from), formed from ab (from, away from) + errō (stray).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

aberrate (third-person singular simple present aberrates, present participle aberrating, simple past and past participle aberrated)

  1. (intransitive) To go astray; to diverge; to deviate (from); deviate from. [mid 18the century][1]
    • (Can we date this quote?) De Quincey
      Their own defective and aberrating vision.
  2. (transitive) To distort; to cause aberration of. [late 19th century][1]

Usage notesEdit

  • The transitive sense is chiefly used in the past tense (as aberrated).

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7), page 4

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

aberrate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of aberrare
  2. second-person plural imperative of aberrare
  3. feminine plural of aberrato

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

aberrāte

  1. first-person plural present active imperative of aberrō
Last modified on 15 April 2014, at 22:40