Open main menu

Wiktionary β

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aberrātus, perfect passive participle of aberrō (wander, stray or deviate from), formed from ab (from, away from) + errō (stray).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

aberrate (third-person singular simple present aberrates, present participle aberrating, simple past and past participle aberrated)

  1. (intransitive) To go astray; to diverge; to deviate (from); deviate from. [mid 18the century][1]
    • (Can we date this quote?), De Quincey, (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      Their own defective and aberrating vision.
  2. (transitive) To distort; to cause aberration of. [late 19th century][1]

Usage notesEdit

  • The transitive sense is chiefly used in the past tense (as aberrated).

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 “aberrate” in Lesley Brown, editor-in-chief; William R. Trumble and Angus Stevenson, editors, The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 5th edition, Oxford; New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 2002, ISBN 978-0-19-860457-0, page 4.

ItalianEdit

LatinEdit