Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

 
Abs

Abbreviation of abdominal muscles.

NounEdit

ab ‎(plural abs)

  1. (informal) abdominal muscle. [Mid 20th century.][1]
    • 2006, H. Peter Steeves, The Things Themselves (page 75)
      The bikinied models in most of the ESPN2 shows have abs. Many of the malnourished bikinied models in the commercials have visible rib cages. How did the two get conflated into a shared vision of beauty?
    • 2010, Bill Geiger, "6-pack Abs in 9 Weeks", Reps! 17:106
      When possible, do your ab workout on a day when you're not training a major muscle group [] .
Usage notesEdit

Most often used attributively. Substantive use is more common in the plural form abs.

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Abbreviation of abscess.

NounEdit

ab ‎(plural abs)

  1. (slang) An abscess caused by injecting an illegal drug, usually heroin.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Abbreviations, see definitions.

VerbEdit

ab

  1. Abbreviation of abort.

NounEdit

ab

  1. Abbreviation of abortion.

PrepositionEdit

ab

  1. Abbreviation of about.

AdverbEdit

ab

  1. Abbreviation of about.

Etymology 4Edit

From the spelling books and the fact that it was the first of the letter combinations.[2]

NounEdit

ab ‎(plural abs)

  1. (US) The early stages of; the beginning process; the start.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Lesley Brown (editor), The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, 5th edition (Oxford University Press, 2003 [1933], ISBN 978-0-19-860575-7), page 2
  2. ^ Mathews, Mitford M, ed. A Dictionary of Americanisms on Historical Principles. 1st. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1956.
  • ab” in The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2000.
  • "ab" in Merriam-Webster's Medical Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, 2002.
  • ab” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.

AnagramsEdit


AynuEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Persian آب(āb).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ab

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • Otto Ladstätter, Andreas Tietze, Die Abdal (Äynu) in Xinjiang (1994)

BlagarEdit

NounEdit

ab

  1. fish

ReferencesEdit

  • A. Schapper (citing Steinhauer), Elevation in the spatial deictic systems of Alor-Pantar languages, in The Alor-Pantar languages: History and Typology, edited by Marian Klamer
  • ASJP, citing L. C. Robinson and G. Holton, Internal classification of the Alor-Pantar language family using computational methods applied to the lexicon (2012)

CatalanEdit

PrepositionEdit

ab

  1. (archaic) amb (with)

DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin ab(of, from).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

ab

  1. ex (out of, sold from)
  2. from (with the origin in time)

Etymology 2Edit

See abe(to ape, mimic).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /aːb/, [æːˀb̥]

VerbEdit

ab

  1. imperative of abe

External linksEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Standard German) IPA(key): /ap/, [ʔäpʰ]
  • (Switzerland) IPA(key): /ab̥/
  • Rhymes: -ap

Etymology 1Edit

From Old High German ab, from Proto-Germanic *ab.

PrepositionEdit

ab

  1. Beginning at that time or location; from.
    Ab heute verfügbar.
    Available from today.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From adverbial use of the preposition in verbs such as abschlagen, abgehen etc.

AdjectiveEdit

ab

  1. (colloquial) off; not attached to anything anymore
    Der Arm ist ab.
    The arm is (hewn) off.
  2. (nonstandard) off; not attached to anything anymore
    Der abbe Arm ist verschwunden.
    The (hewn) off arm has disappeared.
Usage notesEdit
  • The predicative use is common in colloquial German throughout the country.
  • The attributive forms are mostly used in Western and Northern Germany and are considerably less common than the predicative use. They used to be used mostly jocularly, but become gradually more frequent since they are much shorter than the appropriate full verb forms such as abgetrennt(disconnected, severed).
  • The inflected attributive forms retain the devoiced consonant. Hence, sometimes they are spelled with P, rather than B: Appes Bein.

InterlinguaEdit

PrepositionEdit

ab

  1. from

IrishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin abbas(father), from Ancient Greek ἀββᾶς(abbâs), from Aramaic אַבָּא(’abbā, father).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ab m ‎(genitive singular aba, nominative plural abaí)

  1. (Christianity) abbot
DeclensionEdit
Coordinate termsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Contraction of the relative particle a and the prevocalic variant of the past/conditional copula particle b’.

PronunciationEdit

ParticleEdit

ab

  1. Alternative form of ba (used in relative clauses before a vowel sound).
    Fear maith ab ea é.
    He was a good man.
    buachaill ab áirde ná mo dheartháir‎ ― a boy (who was) taller than my brother
Related termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ab n-ab hab t-ab
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *h₂epo(off, away) (English off, of). See also po-.

Alternative formsEdit

  • ā (not used before a vowel or h)
  • abs
  • af (archaic)

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

ab ‎(+ ablative)

  1. by
  2. since, from, after
  3. away from
  4. named after
  5. on; in
  6. on the side of

Usage notesEdit

  • Used in conjunction with passive verbs to mark the agent, e.g. Liber ā discipulō aperītur ("the book is opened by the student").

ReferencesEdit

  • ab in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette, s.v.ab”.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a gentle ascent: collis leniter ab infimo acclivis (opp. leniter a summo declivis)
    • the east winds are blowing: venti ab ortu solis flant
    • the Rhone[TR2] is the frontier between the Helvetii and the Sequani: Rhodanus Sequanos ab Helvetiis dividit
    • to be far from town: longe, procul abesse ab urbe
    • to devote every spare moment to...; to work without intermission at a thing: nullum tempus intermittere, quin (also ab opere, or ad opus)
    • in the fifth year from the founding of the city: anno ab urbe condita quinto
    • to be always at a person's side: ab alicuius latere non discedere
    • to turn one's gaze away from an object: oculos deicere, removere ab aliqua re
    • to trace one's descent from some one: originem ab aliquo trahere, ducere
    • a native of England: ortus ab Anglis or oriundus ex Anglis
    • from one's entry into civil life: ab ineunte (prima) aetate (De Or. 1. 21. 97)
    • to begin with a thing: initium capere; incipere ab aliqua re
    • to start from small beginnings: ab exiguis initiis proficisci
    • the motive, cause, is to be found in..: causa repetenda est ab aliqua re (not quaerenda)
    • to originate in, arise from: ab aliqua re proficisci
    • to rescue from destruction: ab exitio, ab interitu aliquem vindicare
    • to gain a person's esteem, friendship: gratiam inire ab aliquoor apud aliquem
    • to look favourably upon; to support: propenso animo, studio esse or propensa voluntate esse in aliquem (opp. averso animo esse ab aliquo)
    • to gain one's point with any one: aliquid ab aliquo impetrare
    • to win golden opinions from every one: maximam ab omnibus laudem adipisci
    • to have a good or bad reputation, be spoken well, ill of: bene, male audire (ab aliquo)
    • to use up, make full use of one's spare time: otio abūti or otium ad suum usum transferre
    • to draw away some one's attention from a thing: alicuius animum ab aliqua re abducere
    • to hold the same views: idem sentire (opp. dissentire ab aliquo)
    • to apply to a person for advice: consilium petere ab aliquo
    • to rescue from oblivion: aliquid ab oblivione vindicare
    • to be quite uncivilised: ab omni cultu et humanitate longe abesse (B. G. 1. 1. 3)
    • to be educated by some one: litteras discere ab aliquo
    • to receive instruction from some one: institui or erudiri ab aliquo
    • to derive an argument from a thing: argumentum ducere, sumere ex aliqua re or petere ab aliqua re
    • to disagree with a person: dissentire, dissidere ab or cum aliquo
    • to go back to the remote ages: repetere ab ultima (extrema, prisca) antiquitate (vetustate), ab heroicis temporibus
    • to have no taste for the fine arts: abhorrere ab artibus (opp. delectari artibus)
    • to go a long way back (in narrative): longe, alte (longius, altius) repetere (either absolute or ab aliqua re)
    • no sound passed his lips: nulla vox est ab eo audita
    • to extract an answer from some one: responsum ab aliquo ferre, auferre
    • to translate from Plato: ab or de (not ex) Platone vertere, convertere, transferre
    • to form, derive a word from... (used of the man who first creates the word): vocabulum, verbum, nomen ducere ab, ex...
    • the word amicitia comes from amare: nomen amicitiae (or simply amicitia) dicitur ab amando
    • to be separated by a deadly hatred: capitali odio dissidere ab aliquo (De Am. 1. 2)
    • to prevent some one from growing angry, appease his anger: animum alicuius ab iracundia revocare
    • to revenge oneself on some one: ulcisci aliquem, poenas expetere ab aliquo
    • to revenge oneself on another for a thing or on some one's behalf: poenas alicuius or alicuius rei repetere ab aliquo
    • to protect any one from wrong: ab iniuria aliquem defendere
    • to neglect one's duty: ab officio discedere
    • to neglect one's duty: de, ab officio decedere
    • to let oneself be perverted from one's duty: ab officio abduci, avocari
    • to have an inclination for a thing: propensum, proclivem esse ad aliquid (opp. alienum, aversum esse, abhorrere ab aliqua re)
    • the principles which I have followed since I came to man's estate: meae vitae rationes ab ineunte aetate susceptae (Imp. Pomp. 1. 1.)
    • to summon some one from the dead: aliquem ab inferis or a mortuis evocare, excitare (passive ab inferis exsistere)
    • to ask for an oracular response: oraculum petere (ab aliquo)
    • from beginning to end: ab ovo usque ad mala (proverb.)
    • the conversation began with..: sermo ortus est ab aliqua re
    • something has been left as a legacy by some one: hereditate aliquid relictum est ab aliquo
    • I have received a legacy from a person: hereditas ad me or mihi venit ab aliquo (Verr. 2. 1. 10)
    • to lend, borrow money at interest: pecuniam fenori (fenore) alicui dare, accipere ab aliquo
    • to borrow money from some one: pecuniam mutuari or sumere mutuam ab aliquo
    • to demand an account, an audit of a matter: rationem alicuius rei reposcere aliquem or ab aliquo
    • to demand an account, an audit of a matter: rationem ab aliquo reptere de aliqua re (Cluent. 37. 104)
    • to gain some one's favour: gratiam inire apud aliquem, ab aliquo (cf. sect. V. 12)
    • to be on a person's side (not ab alicuius partibus): ab (cum) aliquo stare (Brut. 79. 273)
    • to hold different views in politics: ab aliquo in re publica dissentire
    • to deliver some one from slavery: ab aliquo servitutem or servitutis iugum depellere
    • to exact a penalty from some one: poenam petere, repetere ab aliquo
    • to exact a penalty from some one: poenas expetere ab aliquo
    • to lay down arms: ab armis discedere (Phil. 11. 33)
    • to demand satisfaction, restitution: res repetere (ab aliquo) (Off. 1. 11. 36)
    • to gain a victory over the enemy: victoriam reportare ab hoste
    • putting aside, except: cum discessi, -eris, -eritis ab
  • Latin Dictionary, Lewis and Short, 1879.
  • Lingua Latina, Hans H. Ørberg, 2005.

LivonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare Estonian abi(help).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

a'b

  1. help
  2. (anatomy) shoulder

DeclensionEdit

Usage notesEdit

LĒL also features a partitive plural form with -īdi as in the example abīdi nustõ "to shrug."


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

ab

  1. (Guardiol) with

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Reduced form of Latin apud.

PrepositionEdit

ab

  1. (10th century) with

SynonymsEdit

  • avoec (used throughout Old French into the Middle and modern French periods)

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *ab.

PrepositionEdit

ab

  1. of

Old ProvençalEdit

EtymologyEdit

Reduced form of Latin apud

PrepositionEdit

ab

  1. with

DescendantsEdit


PumpokolEdit

NounEdit

ab

  1. father

RomaniEdit

NounEdit

ab m ‎(plural ab)

  1. river

Scottish GaelicEdit

NounEdit

ab m ‎(genitive singular aba, plural abachan)

  1. Alternative form of aba

TurkishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowing from Persian آب(āb).

NounEdit

ab ‎(definite accusative abı, plural ablar)

  1. (archaic) water

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowing from Arabic عَاب('āb).

NounEdit

ab ‎(definite accusative abı, plural ablar)

  1. (archaic) defect, flaw, imperfection

DeclensionEdit


VolapükEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from German aber(but).

ConjunctionEdit

ab

  1. but