EnglishEdit

NounEdit

alapa (plural alapas)

  1. Alternative form of alap

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of unknown origin.

Originally used by Romans to refer to describe the strike given from master to slave upon manumission as a final act of indignity. First attested in Phaedrus when the Empire was already greatly expanded, then in the Semitic loanword-ridden Juvenal and largely attested in the Christian writings, i. e. from the proponents of a Semitic religion.

Hence, probably from Aramaic אַלַּף(allap̄, to teach), because that’s what a slap does, and/or from Proto-Semitic *ʔallipa (to tame, to domesticate; to familiarize, to instruct, to put together, to join), related via the idea of an ox trained to Proto-Semitic *ʔalp- (ox, ox in a yoke).

NounEdit

alapa f (genitive alapae); first declension

  1. slap, smack (with the flat of the hand)

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative alapa alapae
Genitive alapae alapārum
Dative alapae alapīs
Accusative alapam alapās
Ablative alapā alapīs
Vocative alapa alapae

DescendantsEdit

  • Aromanian: arpã, aripã
  • Calabrian: álipa
  • French: aube
  • Galician: aba (?); labazada (?)
  • Italian: lapazza

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

alapa

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of alapar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of alapar