EnglishEdit

 
A slice of cake (1), specifically a slice of a torte.
 
A layer cake from which a slice has been removed.

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English cake, from Old Norse kaka (cake) (compare Norwegian kake, Icelandic/Swedish kaka, Danish kage), from Proto-Germanic *kakǭ (cake), from Proto-Indo-European *gog (ball-shaped object) (compare Northern Kurdish gog (ball); Romanian gogoașă (doughnut) and gogă (walnut, nut); Lithuanian gúoge (head of cabbage)). Related to cookie, kuchen, and quiche. Doublet of coca.

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: kāk, IPA(key): /keɪk/, [kʰeɪk]
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪk

NounEdit

cake (countable and uncountable, plural cakes)

  1. A rich, sweet dessert food, typically made of flour, sugar, and eggs and baked in an oven, and often covered in icing.
    Synonym: gateau
  2. A small mass of baked dough, especially a thin loaf from unleavened dough.
    an oatmeal cake
    a johnnycake
  3. A thin wafer-shaped mass of fried batter; a griddlecake or pancake.
    buckwheat cakes
  4. A block of any of various dense materials.
    Synonym: block
    a cake of soap
    a cake of sand
  5. (slang) A trivially easy task or responsibility; from a piece of cake.
    Synonyms: piece of cake; see also Thesaurus:easy thing
  6. (slang) Money.
  7. Used to describe the doctrine of having one's cake and eating it too.
    • 2018, The Guardian, "UK's aspirations for post-Brexit trade deal an illusion, says Donald Tusk", Daniel Boffey, Peter Walker, Jennifer Rankin, and Heather Stewart, 23 February 2018
      "It looks like the cake [and eat it] philosophy is still alive." Quote attributed to Donald Tusk.
  8. (slang) A buttock, especially one that is exceptionally plump.
    Mmm, I'd like to cut me some of that cake!
Usage notesEdit
  • In North America, a biscuit is a small, soft baked bread similar to a scone but not sweet. In some cases, it can be hard (see dog biscuit). In the United Kingdom, a biscuit is a small, crisp or firm, sweet baked good — the sort of thing which in North America is called a cookie. (Less frequently, British speakers refer to crackers as biscuits.) In North America, even small, layered baked sweets like Oreos are referred to as cookies, while in the UK, typically only those biscuits which have chocolate chips, nuts, fruit, or other things baked into them are also called cookies.
  • Throughout the English-speaking world, thin, crispy, salty or savoury baked breads like in this image (saltine crackers) are called crackers, while thin, crispy, sweet baked goods like in this image (nila wafers) and this image (wafer sticks) are wafers.
  • Both the US and the UK distinguish crackers, wafers and cookies/biscuits from cakes: the former are generally hard or crisp and become soft when stale, while the latter is generally soft or moist and becomes hard when stale.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Assamese: কে’ক (këk)
  • Dutch: kaak (spelling pronunciation), cake (also keek, older also kaaks, keeks)
  • French: cake
  • Gulf Arabic: كيك(kēk)
  • Hijazi Arabic: كيكة(kēka)
  • Japanese: ケーキ (kēki)
  • Korean: 케이크 (keikeu)
  • Nauruan: keik
  • Portuguese: queque
  • Russian: кек (kek)
  • Spanish: queque
  • Fiji Hindi: kek
  • Zulu: ikhekhe

From the plural cakes:

TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

cake (third-person singular simple present cakes, present participle caking, simple past and past participle caked)

  1. (transitive) Coat (something) with a crust of solid material.
    Synonyms: crust, encrust
    His shoes are caked with mud.
  2. (transitive) To form into a cake, or mass.
  3. (intransitive) Of blood or other liquid, to dry out and become hard.
    • 1887, H. Rider Haggard, She: A History of Adventure[1]:
      Once we fell asleep, and, I think, must have slept for some hours, for, when we woke, our limbs were quite stiff, and the blood from our blows and scratches had caked, and was hard and dry upon our skin.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

cake (third-person singular simple present cakes, present participle caking, simple past and past participle caked)

  1. (Britain, dialect, obsolete, intransitive) To cackle like a goose.

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for cake in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Ásgeir Blöndal MagnússonÍslensk orðsifjabók, 1st edition, 2nd printing (1989). Reykjavík, Orðabók Háskólans, page 458.

Ambonese MalayEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unknown.

VerbEdit

cake

  1. to eat (only used during heated conversations)
    Kalu ale su cake jang bicara lai!Do not speak when you're eating!
    Synonym: makang

DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English cake.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cake m (plural cakes, diminutive cakeje n)

  1. pound cake

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


FijianEdit

AdverbEdit

cake

  1. up

FrenchEdit

 
Un cake au jambon.

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English cake.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cake m (plural cakes)

  1. fruitcake (containing rum).
  2. quick bread (a smallish loaf-shaped baked good which may be sweet like an English cake or salty and with bits of meat. See insert).

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse kaka, from Proto-Germanic *kakǭ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cake (plural cakes)

  1. A cake (any sort of flat doughy food):
    1. (medicine) A cake prepared to cure disease or illness.
    2. (Christianity, rare) A communion wafer.
  2. (rare) A lump, boil, or ball.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unadapted borrowing from English cake, from Middle English cake, from Old Norse kaka.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkeik/, [ˈkei̯k]

NounEdit

cake m (plural cakes)

  1. cake; fruitcake

Tocharian BEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *ték(ʷ)os.

NounEdit

cake ?

  1. river

ReferencesEdit

  • Adams, Douglas Q. (2013) A Dictionary of Tocharian B: Revised and Greatly Enlarged (Leiden Studies in Indo-European; 10), Amsterdam, New York: Rodopi, →ISBN