English edit

Etymology edit

From Japanese (oni).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

oni (plural onis or oni)

  1. A Japanese evil spirit or demon.
    • 1908, Henri L. Joly, Legend in Japanese Art: A Description of Historical Episodes, Legendary Characters, Folk-lore, Myths, Religious Symbolism, Illustrated in the Arts of Old Japan, pages 263–264:
      ONI . Generic name for devils, the representation of which in art is quite a common feature. Onis have claws, a square head with two horns, sharp teeth, and malignant eyes surmounted by big eyebrows; occasionally they wear trousers of tiger skin.
    • 1918, William Elliot Griffis, Dutch Fairy Tales for Young Folks[1]:
      Across the ocean, in Japan, there once lived curious creatures called Onis. Every Japanese boy and girl has heard of them, though one has not often been caught.
    • 1979, Marian Ury, Tales of Times Now Past: Sixty-Two Stories from a Medieval Japanese Collection, University of California Press, →ISBN, page 147:
      "That's no human being playing the instrument," he thought in amazement. "It can only be an oni or some such being."
    • 1992, Karl M. Schwarz, Netsuke Subjects: A Study on the Netsuke Themes with Reference to Their Interpretation and Symbolism, Böhlau Verlag Wien, →ISBN, page 46:
      The standing Shoki holds with his left hand an oni on his leg.
    • 2005, Christopher Hart, Manga Mania Shoujo: How to Draw the Charming and Romantic Characters of Japanese Comics, →ISBN, page 69:
      This is actually a boy bishie in the form of an ogre. It's called an oni in Japanese. Onis have supernatural powers that can command the forces of nature such as wind (to create hurricanes) and lightning (to create thunderbolts).
    • 2011, Mike Shel, “Ecology of the Oni”, in Jade Regent: The Brinewall Legacy, Paizo Publishing, →ISBN, page 69:
      The oni are a diverse group of evil spirits who take on the form of humanoid creatures so that they can enjoy the pleasures and vices of the flesh.

Anagrams edit

Czech edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Czech oni, from Proto-Slavic *oni, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ónos.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈoɲɪ]
  • (file)

Pronoun edit

oni m anim pl

  1. they (third person personal masculine animate plural)

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Pronoun edit

oni

  1. nominative animate masculine plural of onen

Dupaningan Agta edit

Interjection edit

oni

  1. yes

Esperanto edit

Etymology edit

From French on, ultimately from Latin homō (human being; man). English one is not etymologically related to on, but its use as an indefinite personal pronoun was influenced by French. Doublet of homo.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

oni (accusative onin, possessive onia)

  1. (indefinite personal pronoun) one
    Oni povas vidi ĝin.One can see it.
  2. (indefinite pronoun, vague meaning) they (some people, people in general)
    Oni diras, ke Norvegio estas bonega loko por loĝi.They say Norway is a great place to live.

Usage notes edit

  • Comparable to the use of generic "you" in English (e.g. In America, you can do what you want).
  • A sentence whose subject is "oni" can often be translated as an English sentence in the passive voice, for example: "Oni ofte referencas al Kimrio kiel la 'lando de la kanto.'" can be translated as "Wales is often referred to as the 'land of song.'"
  • Although the accusative onin and the possessive onia are possible, they are far less frequent than oni itself. Correlatives such as iun (someone (accusative)) or ies (someone's) are often more natural in contexts where onin or onia might make sense: "one's mother tongue" will usually be rendered ies gepatra lingvo rather than onia gepatra lingvo, though the latter would still be correct. Note that where the subject of a clause is oni, anything that oni possesses in that clause will take the reflexive possessive sia, not onia: Oni plej nature pensas en sia gepatra lingvo (one thinks most naturally in one's mother tongue).

Descendants edit

  • Ido: onu

See also edit

  • unu (one)

Guinau edit

Noun edit

oni

  1. water

References edit

  • Alfred Russel Wallace, A Narrative of Travels on the Amazon and Rio Negro
  • Proceedings [of the] Philological Society, London, Volume 3

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

oni

  1. Rōmaji transcription of おに

Lindu edit

Noun edit

oni

  1. noise

Old Czech edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *oni.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

oni m pl (third person)

  1. they (masculine plural)

Declension edit

Descendants edit

Pronoun edit

oni

  1. nominative masculine plural of onen

Polish edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Polish oni. The oblique case forms come from Proto-Slavic *ji.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

oni vir

  1. they (third-person masculine personal nominative)

Declension edit

See also edit

Further reading edit

  • oni in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *oni, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ónos.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ǒni/
  • Hyphenation: o‧ni

Pronoun edit

òni (Cyrillic spelling о̀ни)

  1. they (nominative plural of ȏn (he))

Declension edit

Slovak edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *oni, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ónos.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

oni

  1. they (third person, personal, m pl)

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • oni”, in Slovníkový portál Jazykovedného ústavu Ľ. Štúra SAV [Dictionary portal of the Ľ. Štúr Institute of Linguistics, Slovak Academy of Science] (in Slovak), https://slovnik.juls.savba.sk, 2024

Slovene edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Slavic *oni.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

óni

  1. they (masculine plural, more than two)

Inflection edit

Forms between parentheses indicate clitic forms; the main forms are used for emphasis.

See also edit

Sranan Tongo edit

Etymology edit

From English honey.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

oni

  1. honey
  2. honey bee, Apis mellifera
    Synonym: onifrei
  3. stingless bee
    Synonym: onifrei

Volapük edit

Pronoun edit

oni

  1. accusative singular of on

Welsh edit

Alternative forms edit

  • onid (used before a vowel)
  • on' (colloquial, before a consonant), on'd (colloquial, before a vowel)

Etymology edit

o (if) +‎ ni (not)

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

oni (triggers mixed mutation except of forms of bod)

  1. unless
    oni lwyddaunless he succeeds
    Oni bai fe yma, bydden ni wedi gwybod.
    Unless he were here, we would have known.
  2. until
    oni ddaw feuntil he comes

Synonyms edit

Particle edit

oni (triggers mixed mutation)

  1. used to introduce a negative question
    Oni fuom yn proffwydo yn dy enw di?
    Did we not prophesy in thy name?
  2. (colloquial) used to form a tag question
    Byddwch chi yma, oni fyddwch chi?
    You'll be there, won't you?

Yoruba edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Cognate with Olukumi òní, Ifè òní, and likely cognate with Igala èñíni.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

òní

  1. today
    Òní ni ọjọ́-ìbí mi.
    Today is my birthday.
    • 2008 December 19, Yiwola Awoyale, Global Yoruba Lexical Database v. 1.0[2], number LDC2008L03, Philadelphia: Linguistic Data Consortium, →DOI, →ISBN:
      Òní l'a rí, ọba òkè l'ó rọ́la.
      It is [only] today that we see, [only] the Most High sees tomorrow (proverb on divine supremacy)

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Awoyale, Yiwola (December 19, 2008) Global Yoruba Lexical Database v. 1.0[3], volume LDC2008L03, Philadelphia: Linguistic Data Consortium, →ISBN
  • Salem Ǒchála È̩jè̩bá (2016) A Grammar of Ígálâ, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria: The Linguistic Association of Nigeria (LAN), M & J Grand Orbit Communications Ltd., →ISBN
  • SIL International (2016) Dictionnaire Ifè[4] (in French)