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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Latin āmanuēnsis (secretary), from ab- (from, off (of)) +‎ manus (hand) +‎ -ensis (of or from (a place)).

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: ə-măn'yo͞o-ĕnʹsĭs
  • Hyphenation: a‧man‧u‧en‧sis

NounEdit

amanuensis (plural amanuenses)

  1. One employed to take dictation, or copy manuscripts.
  2. A clerk, secretary or stenographer, or scribe.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314, page 0088:
      “[…] We are engaged in a great work, a treatise on our river fortifications, perhaps? But since when did army officers afford the luxury of amanuenses in this simple republic? []

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

ReferencesEdit

  • Gamble, Harry Y. “Amanuensis.” Anchor Bible Dictionary. Vol. 1. Ed. David Noel Freedman. New York: Doubleday, 1992.
  • Longenecker, Richard N. “Ancient Amanuenses and the Pauline Epistles.” New Dimensions in New Testament Study. Eds. Richard N. Longenecker and Merrill C. Tenney. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1974. 281-97. idem, “On the Form, Function, and Authority of the New Testament Letters.” Scripture and Truth. Eds. D.A. Carson and John D. Woodbridge. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1983. 101-14.

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin āmanuēnsis (secretary), from ab- (from, off (of)) +‎ manus (hand) +‎ -ensis (of or from (a place)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

amanuensis c (singular definite amanuensen or amanuensissen, plural indefinite amanuenser)

  1. A teacher at an institute of higher education with a time-limited position (usually three years).
  2. An assistent with a scientific education, e.g. to a doctor in private practice.

InflectionEdit

ReferencesEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From ab- +‎ manus (hand) +‎ -ēnsis.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

āmanuēnsis m (genitive āmanuēnsis); third declension

  1. secretary, clerk

Usage notesEdit

Originally used for a slave at his master's personal service 'within hand reach', performing any command. Later, it was specifically applied to intimately trusted servants (also many freedmen) acting as a personal secretary.

InflectionEdit

Third declension i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative āmanuēnsis āmanuēnsēs
Genitive āmanuēnsis āmanuēnsium
Dative āmanuēnsī āmanuēnsibus
Accusative āmanuēnsem āmanuēnsēs
Ablative āmanuēnse āmanuēnsibus
Vocative āmanuēnsis āmanuēnsēs

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • amanuensis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • amanuensis in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • amanuensis in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin