scribe

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English scribe, from Old French scribe ‎(scribe), from Late Latin usage of scriba ‎(secretary) (used in Vulgate to render Ancient Greek γραμματεύς ‎(grammateús, scribe, secretary), which had been used in its turn to render the Hebrew סופר ‎(writer, scholar)) from scribere ‎(to write, draw, draw up, draft (a paper), enlist, enroll, levy; orig. to scratch), probably akin to scrobs ‎(a ditch, trench, grave).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

scribe ‎(plural scribes)

  1. One who writes; a draughtsman; a writer for another; especially, an official or public writer; an amanuensis or secretary; a notary; a copyist.
    • 2013 September 14, Jane Shilling, “The Golden Thread: the Story of Writing, by Ewan Clayton, review [print edition: Illuminating language]”[1], The Daily Telegraph (Review), page R28:
      [T]he pleasure of writing on wax with a stylus is exemplified by the fine, flowing hand of a Roman scribe who made out the birth certificate of Herennia Gemella, born March 128 AD.
    1. A person who writes books or documents by hand as a professionW.
      • 2013 September-October, Henry Petroski, “The Evolution of Eyeglasses”, American Scientist:
        The ability of a segment of a glass sphere to magnify whatever is placed before it was known around the year 1000, when the spherical segment was called a reading stone, [] . Scribes, illuminators, and scholars held such stones directly over manuscript pages as an aid in seeing what was being written, drawn, or read.
  2. (archaic) A writer and doctor of the law; one skilled in the law and traditions; one who read and explained the law to the people.
  3. A very sharp, steel drawing implement used in engraving and etching, a scriber.
  4. A writer, especially a journalist.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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VerbEdit

scribe ‎(third-person singular simple present scribes, present participle scribing, simple past and past participle scribed)

  1. To write.
  2. To write, engrave, or mark upon; to inscribe.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
  3. To record.
  4. To write or draw with a scribe.
  5. (carpentry) To cut (anything) in such a way as to fit closely to a somewhat irregular surface, as a baseboard to a floor which is out of level, a board to the curves of a moulding, etc.; so called because the workman marks, or scribes, with the compasses the line that he afterwards cuts.
  6. To score or mark with compasses or a scribing iron.

Related termsEdit

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InterlinguaEdit

LatinEdit

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