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the apple does not fall far from the tree

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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

ProverbEdit

the apple does not fall far from the tree

  1. (idiomatic) A child grows up to be similar to its parents, both in behavior and in physical characteristics.
    • 1842, E. A. Freidlaender (translator), Frederika Bremer (author), The Neighbours, ch. 10:
      It is impossible to look at Madam Rhen, without at once making the conclusion that she is pleasantness, hospitality, and loquacity itself; nor can one look upon her daughter Renetta without thinking, "the apple does not fall far from the tree!"
    • 1978, Dr. Isador Rosenfeld, "Doctor Asks Patient ‘Where The Action Is’," Pittsburgh Press, 3 July, p. C1 (retrieved 16 Oct 2010):
      It's important that I know what diseases affect other members of your immediate family, because "the apple does not fall far from the tree."

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Gregory Y. Titelman, Random House Dictionary of Popular Proverbs and Sayings, 1996, →ISBN, p. 15.