English edit

Etymology edit

From late Middle English approbacioun, from Old French approbacion (French approbation), from Latin approbatio, from approbare (to assent to as good, approve, also show to be good, confirm), from ad (to) + probare (approve, commend), from probus (good).

Pronunciation edit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌæp.ɹəʊˈbeɪ.ʃən/, /ˌæp.ɹəˈbeɪ.ʃən/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˌæp.ɹoʊˈbeɪ.ʃən/, /ˌæp.ɹəˈbeɪ.ʃən/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

Noun edit

approbation (countable and uncountable, plural approbations)

  1. The act of approving; an assenting to the propriety of a thing with some degree of pleasure or satisfaction; approval, sanction, commendation or official recognition.
    Synonyms: approval, concurrence, consent, liking, sanction; see also Thesaurus:praise
    Antonym: disapprobation
    • 1796, William Melmoth (tr.), The Letters of Pliny the Consul: With Occasional Remarks, 9th edition, page 20:
      I am very sensible how much nobler it is to place the reward of virtue in the silent approbation of one's own breast
    • 1815, Jane Austen, Emma, volume II, chapter 11:
      As a counsellor she was not wanted; but as an approver, (a much safer character,) she was truly welcome. Her approbation, at once general and minute, warm and incessant, could not but please; and for another half-hour they were all walking to and fro, between the different rooms, some suggesting, some attending, and all in happy enjoyment of the future.
    • 1838, [Letitia Elizabeth] Landon (indicated as editor), chapter XX, in Duty and Inclination: [], volume II, London: Henry Colburn, [], →OCLC, page 286:
      ...it was with the view to judge how far my own desires would act in harmony with the wishes of my family. Such an alliance cannot fail of meeting with their most flattering approbation.
    • 1866, Thomas Babington Macaulay, The Works of Lord Macaulay, Complete: History of England[1], page 342:
      Many, therefore, who did not assent to all that the King had said, joined in a loud hum of approbation when he concluded.
    • 1871, Charles Darwin, chapter 3, in The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex. [], volume I, London: John Murray, [], →OCLC:
      [A]nimals not only love, but have desire to be loved. . . . They love approbation or praise.

Usage notes edit

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913) makes the following comment:

Approbation and approval have the same general meaning, assenting to or declaring as good, sanction, commendation; but approbation is stronger and more positive.
  • We may be anxious for the approbation of our friends; but we should be still more anxious for the approval of our own consciences.
  • He who is desirous to obtain universal approbation will learn a good lesson from the fable of the old man and his ass.
  • The work has been examined by several excellent judges, who have expressed their unqualified approval of its plan and execution.

Related terms edit

Translations edit

See also edit

Further reading edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Ecclesiastical Latin approbātiōnem.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

approbation f (plural approbations)

  1. approval (permission)

Related terms edit

Further reading edit