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EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From French sanction, from Latin sanctio.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈsæŋkʃən/
  • (file)

NounEdit

sanction (countable and uncountable, plural sanctions)

  1. An approval, by an authority, generally one that makes something valid.
  2. A penalty, punishment, or some coercive measure, intended to ensure compliance; especially one adopted by several nations, or by an international body.
  3. A law, treaty, or contract, or a clause within a law, treaty, or contract, specifying any of the above.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

sanction (third-person singular simple present sanctions, present participle sanctioning, simple past and past participle sanctioned)

  1. (transitive) To ratify; to make valid.
  2. (transitive) To give official authorization or approval to; to countenance.
    • 1946, Bertrand Russell, History of Western Philosophy, I.21:
      Many of the most earnest Protestants were business men, to whom lending money at interest was essential. Consequently first Calvin, and then other Protestant divines, sanctioned interest.
  3. (transitive) To penalize (a State etc.) with sanctions.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sanctio

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sanction f (plural sanctions)

  1. sanction

Further readingEdit