See also: Arche, archè, and -arche

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ἀρχή (arkhḗ, literally beginning, origin)

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɑː(ɹ)ki/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)ki

NounEdit

arche (uncountable)

  1. (philosophy, often italicized) The first principle of existing things in pre-Socratic philosophy, initially assumed to be of water.
    • 2012, Lydia Pyne; Stephen J. Pyne, chapter 3, in The Last Lost World, Penguin, →ISBN:
      In more modern times both the moving and the matter moved appear more complex and malleable, and less drawn from the realm of everyday experience. The substance may be dark matter and quarks rather than water or air, and the arche may be gravity or string harmonics.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

 
French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French arche, borrowed from Late Latin arca, from Latin arcus.

NounEdit

arche f (plural arches)

  1. (architecture) arch

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Latin arca.

NounEdit

arche f (plural arches)

  1. ark (Noah's ship)

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

arche f

  1. plural of arca

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

arche f (plural arches)

  1. (Jersey, architecture) arch

Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

arche f (oblique plural arches, nominative singular arche, nominative plural arches)

  1. arch

DescendantsEdit

  • French: arche
  • Middle English: arch, arche