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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Latin argūmentum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

argumentum (plural argumenta)

  1. (chiefly formal, in law, logic, etc.) Used in numerous Latin phrases (and occasionally alone) in the sense of “appeal” or “argument”.
    • 1682: Sir Edward Coke, Argumentum anti-Normannicum, main title (John Darby)
      Argumentum anti-Normannicum: or, An argument proving, from ancient histories and records, that William, Duke of Normandy, made no absolute conquest of England by the sword; in the sense of our modern writers.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

arguō (I prove or demonstrate”, “I assert or allege) +‎ -mentum (instrument”, “medium”, “result of)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

argūmentum n (genitive argūmentī); second declension

  1. argument (as in an argument for a position); evidence, a proof
  2. a point, a theme
  3. a topic, thesis
  4. a plot, especially in theater.

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative argūmentum argūmenta
Genitive argūmentī argūmentōrum
Dative argūmentō argūmentīs
Accusative argūmentum argūmenta
Ablative argūmentō argūmentīs
Vocative argūmentum argūmenta

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • argūmentum in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • argumentum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • argumentum in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • argūmentum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, page 160
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • a strong, striking proof: argumentum firmum, magnum
    • to bring forward a proof: argumentum afferre
    • to quote an argument in favour of immortality: argumentum immortalitatis afferre (not pro)
    • to bring forward a proof of the immortality of the soul: argumentum afferre, quo animos immortales esse demonstratur
    • a proof of this is that..: argumento huic rei est, quod
    • to prove a thing indisputably: argumentis confirmare, comprobare, evincere aliquid (or c. Acc. c. Inf.)
    • to derive an argument from a thing: argumentum ducere, sumere ex aliqua re or petere ab aliqua re
    • to persist in an argument, press a point: argumentum premere (not urgere)
    • the points on which proofs are based; the grounds of proof: loci (τόποι) argumentorum (De Or. 2. 162)
    • to refute arguments: argumenta refellere, confutare
    • the plot of the piece: argumentum
    • I have nothing to write about: non habeo argumentum scribendi
    • I have nothing to write about: deest mihi argumentum ad scribendum (Att. 9. 7. 7)
  • argumentum in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • argūmentum” on page 168/1 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (1st ed., 1968–82)
  • Niermeyer, Jan Frederik (1976), “argumentum”, in Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus, Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 59/2