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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin thesis, from Ancient Greek θέσις (thésis, a proposition, a statement, a thing laid down, thesis in rhetoric, thesis in prosody).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈθiːsɪs/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːsɪs

NounEdit

thesis (plural theses)

  1. A statement supported by arguments.
  2. A written essay, especially one submitted for a university degree.
    • Goldsmith
      I told them of the grave, becoming, and sublime deportment they should assume upon this mystical occasion, and read them two homilies and a thesis of my own composing, to prepare them.
  3. (logic) An affirmation, or distinction from a supposition or hypothesis.
  4. (music) The accented part of the measure, expressed by the downward beat; the opposite of arsis.
  5. (poetry) The depression of the voice in pronouncing the syllables of a word.
  6. (poetry) The part of the metrical foot upon which such a depression falls.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin thesis, from Ancient Greek θέσις (thésis, a proposition, a statement, a thing laid down, thesis in rhetoric, thesis in prosody).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: the‧sis

NounEdit

thesis f (plural theses or thesissen, diminutive thesisje n)

  1. thesis
    Synonyms: dissertatie, proefschrift

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek θέσις (thésis, a proposition, a statement, a thing laid down, thesis in rhetoric, thesis in prosody).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

thesis f (genitive thesis); third declension

  1. thesis

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative thesis thesēs
Genitive thesis thesum
Dative thesī thesibus
Accusative thesem thesēs
Ablative these thesibus
Vocative thesis thesēs

ReferencesEdit