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See also: artífice

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Middle French artifice, from Latin artificium.

NounEdit

artifice (countable and uncountable, plural artifices)

  1. A crafty but underhanded deception.
  2. A trick played out as an ingenious, but artful, ruse.
  3. A strategic maneuver that uses some clever means to avoid detection or capture.
  4. A tactical move to gain advantage.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

artifice (third-person singular simple present artifices, present participle artificing, simple past and past participle artificed)

  1. To construct by means of skill or specialised art
    • 1867, Egbert Pomroy Watson, The Modern Practice of American Machinists and Engineers []:
      The Creator has so cunningly endowed our bodies that there is no labor to be done, no skill in artificing or fashioning the metals, that is beyond our reach.
    • 1900, Country Life, volume 7, page 138:
      Some of the greatest artists of their day either furnished designs or with their own hands artificed ornaments for domestic use,
    • 1922, Appalachian Mountain Club, The A.M.C. White Mountain Guide: A Guide to Trails in the Mountains:
      Splints and slings, already described, are easily artificed out of small saplings or from stiff bark.

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • artifice at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • artifice in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin artificium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

artifice m (plural artifices)

  1. artifice, trick, ploy
  2. (literary) device

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

artifice

  1. ablative singular of artifex