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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin asylum, from Ancient Greek ἄσυλον (ásulon).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /əˈsaɪləm/

NounEdit

asylum (plural asylums or asyla)

  1. A place of safety.
  2. The protection, physical and legal, afforded by such a place.
  3. (dated) A place of protection or restraint for one or more classes of the disadvantaged, especially the mentally ill.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 5, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Of all the queer collections of humans outside of a crazy asylum, it seemed to me this sanitarium was the cup winner. [] When you're well enough off so's you don't have to fret about anything but your heft or your diseases you begin to get queer, I suppose.

SynonymsEdit

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LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek ἄσυλον (ásulon).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

asȳlum n (genitive asȳlī); second declension

  1. asylum (place of refuge), sanctuary

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative asȳlum asȳla
Genitive asȳlī asȳlōrum
Dative asȳlō asȳlīs
Accusative asȳlum asȳla
Ablative asȳlō asȳlīs
Vocative asȳlum asȳla

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • asylum in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • asylum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • asylum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • asylum in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • asylum in Samuel Ball Platner (1929), Thomas Ashby, editor, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, London: Oxford University Press
  • asylum in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin