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EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English bakynge; equivalent to bake +‎ -ing.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

baking

  1. present participle of bake.

AdjectiveEdit

baking (not comparable)

  1. (figuratively) Of a person, an object, or the weather: very hot; boiling, broiling, roasting.
    I'm baking – could you open the window?
    The car was baking after having been parked in the sun the whole afternoon.

NounEdit

baking (usually uncountable, plural bakings)

  1. An action in which something is baked.
    I'm going to do some baking this afternoon.
    • 1861, Harriet Jacobs (Linda Brent), Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl[1]:
      Upon these terms, after working hard all day for her mistress, she began her midnight bakings, assisted by her two oldest children.
  2. The way in which something is baked.
    • 1871, Ledyard Bill, Minnesota; Its Character and Climate[2]:
      How often have we risen in the morning, after spending the night in this manner, with a feeling akin to that which we fancy would come from being knocked in the head with a sack of meal, then gently stewed, and all out of pure fraternal regard to supply any deficiencies in our original bakings.
    • 1913, Captain R. F. Scott, Scott's Last Expedition Volume I[3]:
      Clissold's work of cooking has fallen on Hooper and Lashly, and it is satisfactory to find that the various dishes and bread bakings maintain their excellence.
  3. (countable) The production of a batch of baked product.

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From bake +‎ -ing

NounEdit

baking m, f (definite singular bakinga or bakingen)

  1. baking

Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From bake +‎ -ing

NounEdit

baking f (definite singular bakinga)

  1. baking