See also: Hot, HOT, hót, hôt, hớt, hột, and hoț

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (physically attractive): hawt (slang, especially Internet), hott (slang, especially Internet)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English hot, hat, from Old English hāt (hot, fervent, fervid, fierce), from Proto-Germanic *haitaz (hot), from Proto-Indo-European *kay- (hot; to heat). Cognate with Scots hate, hait (hot), North Frisian hiet (hot), Saterland Frisian heet (hot), West Frisian hjit (hot), Dutch heet (hot), Low German het (hot), German Low German heet (hot), German heiß (hot), Danish hed (hot), Swedish het (hot), Icelandic heitur (hot).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

hot (comparative hotter, superlative hottest)

  1. (of an object) Having or giving off a high temperature.
    He forgot that the frying pan was hot and burned his hand.
    It is too hot to be outside.
    It is hotter in summer than in winter.
    • 1977, Agatha Christie, chapter 4, in An Autobiography, part II, London: Collins, →ISBN:
      There was also hairdressing: hairdressing, too, really was hairdressing in those times — no running a comb through it and that was that. It was curled, frizzed, waved, put in curlers overnight, waved with hot tongs; [].
  2. (of a person or animal) Feeling the sensation of heat, especially to the point of discomfort.
    I was so hot from being in the sun too long.
    Aren't you hot with that thick coat on?
  3. Feverish.
  4. (of a temper) Easily provoked to anger.
    Be careful, he has a hot temper and may take it out on you.
  5. (of food) Spicy, pungent, piquant, as some chilis and other spices are.
    This kind of chili pepper is way too hot for my taste.
  6. (not comparable) Electrically charged.
    a hot wire
  7. (informal) Radioactive. [from the 20thc.]
  8. Active, in use or ready for use (like a bullet or a firing range), turned on (like a microphone or camera).
    • 2004, Phillip Moore, Sealed for a Purpose, page 213:
      The microphone was hot and the show was on the air.
    • 2013, Larry Munson, Tony Barnhart, From Herschel to a Hobnail Boot: The Life and Times of Larry Munson, Triumph Books (→ISBN), page 52:
      So I just blurted out, "This is really a fucking way to make a living, huh?" [] The microphone was hot, and I knew I was in trouble. The radio management came to my house and suspended me immediately.
    • 2014, Don Carpenter, The Hollywood Trilogy: A Couple of Comedians, The True Story of Jody McKeegan, and Turnaround, Catapult (→ISBN)
      I leaned forward, still ogling, thinking the camera was off me until the end of the song, but then on went the little red light that meant my camera was hot ...
    • 2017, Charles Henderson, Terminal Impact, Penguin (→ISBN), page 8:
      “Your range is hot, corporal. Wind unchanged. You've got your dope. Fire at will,” Hacksaw said, snapping the camera as fast as the motor drive could run ...
    • 2017, Scott Kelly, Endurance: My Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery, Vintage (→ISBN)
      I join the space-to-ground channel to warn Terry that his mic is hot and that everyone with an internet connection or tuned to NASA TV can hear every word ...
    • 2020, A.J. Stone, Project Titan, Page Publishing Inc (→ISBN)
      “The range is hot, chief. Fire at will.” Alex says with a smile as he steps back and puts his shooting ear muffs on. “I'm going to shoot, major.
    • 2020, Ferrett Steinmetz, Automatic Reload: A Novel, Tor Books (→ISBN):
      I run an inventory, verify all bullets are hot in the chamber. They are. But the showroom prosthetics have all exited attraction mode.
  9. (informal) Very good, remarkable, exciting. [from the 19thc.]
    He's a hot young player, we should give him a trial.
  10. Popular; in demand.
    This new pickup is so hot we can't keep it in stock!
  11. Of great current interest; provoking current debate or controversy.
    a hot topic
  12. Performing strongly; having repeated successes.
    • 1938, Harold M. Sherman, "Shooting Stars," Boys' Life (March 1938), Published by Boy Scouts of America, p.5:
      "Keep going! You're hot tonight!" urged Wally.
    • 2002, Peter Krause & Andy King, Play-By-Play Golf, First Avenue Editions, p.55:
      The ball lands on the fairway, just a couple of yards in front of the green. "Nice shot Sarah! You're hot today!" Jenny says.
  13. Fresh; just released.
    • 1960, Super Markets of the Sixties: Findings, recommendations.- v.2. The plans and sketches, Super Market Institute, p.30:
      A kid can stand in the street and sell newspapers, if the headlines are hot.
    • 2000, David Cressy, Travesties and transgressions in Tudor and Stuart England: tales of discord and dissension, Oxford University Press, p.34:
      Some of these publications show signs of hasty production, indicating that they were written while the news was hot.
  14. (slang, of a person) Very physically and/or sexually attractive.
    That stripper is hot!
  15. (slang) Sexual or sexy; involving sexual intercourse or sexual excitement.
    • 2010, Rick R. Reed, Moving Toward The Light[1], →ISBN, page 50:
      There was only one problem. Paul was HIV positive. And just a few weeks after his hot encounter with Max, a letter arrived for him, containing some legalese about HIV infection being a criminal act, with a few chilling words
  16. (slang) Sexually aroused; randy.
    Enough foreplay! You’ve gotten me so hot already!
  17. (slang, with for) Attracted to.
    hot for her English teacher
  18. Very close to finding or guessing something to be found or guessed.
    Am I warm yet?You're hot!
  19. Uncomfortable, difficult to deal with; awkward, dangerous, unpleasant.
    • 1938, Daphne de Maurier, Rebecca:
      The car sped along. She kept her foot permanently on the accelerator, and took every corner at an acute angle. Two motorists we passed looked out of their windows outraged as she swept by, and one pedestrian in a lane waved his stick at her. I felt rather hot for her. She did not seem to notice though. I crouched lower in my seat.
    • 1997, David Wojnarowicz; Amy Scholder, The Waterfront Journals:
      I've been living here a few weeks and it's starting to get a little hot for me … I've written myself out of several states in the last six years.
    • 1999, Sam Llewellyn, The shadow in the sands, page 68:
      The police are looking for an anarchist who answers my description, seen leaving the house the day before the fire; there was an explosion [] So what with one thing and another, His Grace thinks the country a little hot for me now
    • 2004, Meredith Blevins, The Hummingbird Wizard:
      "Things are a little hot for us in San Francisco. We'll burn the vardo at Drake's Bay and then head to your place." "Things are hot, so you're heading to my place?" "Hot's not a big deal. Just a matter of jurisdiction and time.
    • 2008, Charlaine Harris; Toni L. P. Kelner, Wolfsbane and Mistletoe, page 287:
      I'd also thought things might have gotten a little hot for him in Atlantic City, so he'd moved West to its bigger, badder cousin, where he wasn't as well known
  20. (slang) Characterized by police presence or activity.
    I wouldn't speed through here if I was you. This area is hot this time of night.
  21. (slang) Used to emphasize the short duration or small quantity of something
    He was finished in a hot minute.
    I dated him for a hot second.
  22. Stolen. [from the 20thc.]
    hot merchandise
    • 2010, Robert Eversz, Burning Garbo: A Nina Zero Novel, Simon and Schuster (→ISBN), page 17:
      The camera was hot. Buying a hot camera was a parole violation.
  23. (slang, of a draft/check) Not covered by funds on account.
    I wouldn't trust him. He gave me a hot check last week.

QuotationsEdit

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Terms derived from hot (adjective)

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AdverbEdit

hot (comparative hotter, superlative hottest)

  1. Hotly, at a high temperature.
    • 2013, Ted Reader, Gastro Grilling: Fired-up Recipes To Grill Great Everyday Meals, Penguin Canada (→ISBN):
      Oak burns hot and lasts a long time. Its smoke is a medium to heavy flavor but not too overpowering. It leaves a buttersmooth, nutty finish.
  2. Rapidly, quickly.
    • 1994, Cycle World Magazine, page 74:
      Whatever happened, braking into the next-to-last hairpin, a blue-sky turn called Cog Cut, Durelle went in too hot.
    • 2009, Dan Vining, Among the Living, Penguin (→ISBN):
      He went in hotter than he could have, the Cforce snugging him into the bucket seat. At the first switchback, there was already a hundred-foot drop-off []
    • 2014, Dennis Foley, Take Back the Night: A Novel of Vietnam, Open Road Media (→ISBN):
      He rolled over on his belly and raised up enough to see the second chopper coming in hotter, more deliberately than the first. Hollister grabbed Jrae by the ...
    • 2016, Patrick Carman, Omega Rising, Random House Books for Young Readers (→ISBN), page 26:
      They were coming in hotter than Dash liked, nose down toward the watery surface []
    • 2019, David W. Nelson, Ghost Squadron: Wwii Teenage Pilot (→ISBN):
      “When landing on dirt, gravel, or pavement, you'll be coming in hotter, faster than a runway made of grass, so try and keep that in mind.
    • 2021, Christine D. Shuck, G581: Mars:
      "You're coming in hotter than we'd like." "Roger that, Huygens, increasing reverse thrust by 20%."
  3. (especially in the phrase "come in hot", "go in hot") While shooting, while firing one's weapon(s).
    • 2015, Dave Barr, Four Flags, The Odyssey of a Professional Soldier: Part 1: US Marine Corps Vietnam 1969-72, Israeli Defence Force 1975-77, Helion and Company (→ISBN), page 121:
      We would pop over the riverbank and come down hot (shooting) on a designated target. [] We started rolling in hot with rockets, then suddenly we started taking fire from the  []
    • 2016, Stephen Robertson CD BA ATPL, Go for Shakedown, Xlibris Corporation (→ISBN)
      "Shakedown is rolling in hot in Nakhoney right now. You're just in time. They've been getting shot at and are in overwatch for India 21 patrolling," []

VerbEdit

hot (third-person singular simple present hots, present participle hotting, simple past and past participle hotted)

  1. (with up) To heat; to make or become hot.
  2. (with up) To become lively or exciting.
    • 2018 "Clean Slate", Wentworth
      Turf war's hotting up.

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Unknown.

AdjectiveEdit

hot (comparative hoter, superlative hotst)

  1. (nautical) right, on the right side
    Synonym: rechts
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English hot.

AdjectiveEdit

hot (comparative hotter, superlative hotst)

  1. (informal) hot, popular
  2. (informal) hot, sexy, attractive
InflectionEdit
Inflection of hot
uninflected hot
inflected hotte
comparative hotter
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial hot hotter het hotst
het hotste
indefinite m./f. sing. hotte hottere hotste
n. sing. hot hotter hotste
plural hotte hottere hotste
definite hotte hottere hotste
partitive hots hotters

FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

Template:fr-adj-inv

  1. heated
  2. interesting

IngrianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Russian хоть (xotʹ).

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

hot

  1. though

ParticleEdit

hot

  1. Used to make a pronoun, adverb or determiner indefinite
    hot kenanyone, whoever
    hot kukaany, whichever

ReferencesEdit

  • Vitalij Chernyavskij (2005) Ižoran keel (Ittseopastaja)[2]

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English hāt.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

hot

  1. hot

NounEdit

hot (uncountable)

  1. hotness

DescendantsEdit

  • English: hot
  • Scots: hat, hait, hate
  • Yola: hoat, hote

ReferencesEdit


Pennsylvania GermanEdit

VerbEdit

hot

  1. third-person singular present indicative of hawwe

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

hot (plural hot or hots)

  1. hot; sexy

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish hōt n, from Old Norse hót n pl, from Proto-Germanic *hwōtō (threat), cognate with Gothic 𐍈𐍉𐍄𐌰 f (ƕōta). Related to *hwētaną (to attack, stab).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hot n

  1. a threat

DeclensionEdit

Declension of hot 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative hot hotet hot hoten
Genitive hots hotets hots hotens

Related termsEdit


WestrobothnianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Compare Icelandic hót, contraction of Old Norse hvat.

NounEdit

hot m

  1. A whit, a bit.
    n litn hot
    a little bit, a little piece

Etymology 2Edit

Ablaut of Icelandic hvata (to sting, jab,) dialectal Norwegian hvæta (to jab,) and related to gwätt, wäti.

NounEdit

hot n (nominative & accusative definite singular hote)

  1. A sting, pang.
    ja hav söm e hot ått brösten
    I feel a sting in my chest.