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Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English bereærn. Equivalent to bere +‎ -ern.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɛrn/, /ˈbɛːrn/

NounEdit

bern (plural bernes)

  1. barn, farm building, granary
    • a. 1382, John Wycliffe, “Matheu 3:12”, in Wycliffe's Bible:
      Whos wynewing cloth is in his hoond, and he ſhal fulli clenſe his corn flore, and ſhal gadere his whete in to his berne; but the chaffe he ſhal brenne with fier that mai not be quenchid.
      His winnowing fan is in his hand, and he'll completely clean his threshing-floor and gather up his wheat into his barn, but the chaff he'll burn with unquenchable fire.
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English bearn.

NounEdit

bern

  1. Alternative form of barn (child)

Etymology 3Edit

From Old English beorn.

NounEdit

bern

  1. Alternative form of berne (knight)

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English bern, from Old English bereærn.

NounEdit

bern (plural berns)

  1. barn

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian bern, barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bern n (plural bern, diminutive berntsje)

  1. child, children

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • bern (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011