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See also: Bärn

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EnglishEdit

 
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A barn (farm building) in Lithuania

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English bern, from Old English bearn, bern, contracted forms of Old English berern, bereærn (barn, granary), compound of bere (barley) and ærn, ræn (dwelling, barn), from Proto-Germanic *razną (compare Old Norse rann), from pre-Germanic *h₁rh̥₁-s-nó-, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁erh₁- (to rest). More at rest and barley.

NounEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

barn (plural barns)

  1. (agriculture) A building, often found on a farm, used for storage or keeping animals such as cattle.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 11, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      One day I was out in the barn and he drifted in. I was currying the horse and he set down on the wheelbarrow and begun to ask questions.
  2. (nuclear physics) A unit of surface area equal to 10-28 square metres.
  3. (informal, basketball, ice hockey) An arena.
    Maple Leaf Gardens was a grand old barn.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

barn (third-person singular simple present barns, present participle barning, simple past and past participle barned)

  1. (transitive) To lay up in a barn.
    • Shakespeare
      Men [] often barn up the chaff, and burn up the grain.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fuller to this entry?)

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English barn, bern, from Old English bearn (child, son, offspring, prodigy) and Old Norse barn (child). More at bairn.

NounEdit

barn (plural barns)

  1. (dialectal, parts of Northern England) A child.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Cornish barna.

VerbEdit

barn

  1. (transitive) to judge

InflectionEdit

ConjugationEdit

Personal forms
Indicative Conditional Imperative
Present Imperfect Preterite Future Present Imperfect
1s barnan barnen barnis barnin barnfen barnjen -
2s barnez barnes barnjout barni barnfes barnjes barn
3s barn barne barnas barno barnfe barnje barnet
1p barnomp barnemp barnjomp barnimp barnfemp barnjemp barnomp
2p barnit barnec'h barnjoc'h barnot barnfec'h barnjec'h barnit
3p barnont barnent barnjont barnint barnfent barnjent barnent
0 barner barned barnjod barnor barnfed barnjed -
Impersonal forms Mutated forms
Infinitive: barn
Present participle: o varn
Past participle: barnet (auxiliary verb: kaout)
Soft mutation after a: a varn-
Mixed mutation after e: e varn-
Soft mutation after ne/na: ne/na varn-

Derived termsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Danish barn, from Old Norse barn (child), from Proto-Germanic *barną.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /barn/, [b̥ɑːˀn]

NounEdit

barn n (singular definite barnet, plural indefinite børn)

  1. child (immature human)
    Dette er ikke et passende sted for børn.
    This is not a fitting place for children.
  2. child (human offspring)
    Mine børn er alle flyttet hjemmefra.
    My children have all moved out.

Usage notesEdit

In compounds: barn-, barne-, barns- or børne-.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną, the passive participle of *beraną; cognate with Latvian bērns (child), Lithuanian bérnas (servant); from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

barn n (genitive singular barns, plural børn)

  1. child

DeclensionEdit

Declension of barn
n5 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative barn barnið børn børnini
accusative barn barnið børn børnini
dative barni barninum børnum børnunum
genitive barns barnsins barna barnanna

FrenchEdit

NounEdit

barn m (plural barns)

  1. (physics) barn (unit)

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

barn

  1. Romanization of 𐌱𐌰𐍂𐌽

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

barn n (genitive singular barns, nominative plural börn)

  1. child

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English bearn, from Proto-Germanic *barną.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /barn/, /baːrn/, /bɛrn/

NounEdit

barn (plural barnes or barnen)

  1. A member of one's immediate offspring or progeny.
  2. A child, youth, or baby
  3. A person; a member of humanity
  4. A younger soldier or fighter
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English bereærn.

NounEdit

barn

  1. Alternative form of bern (barn)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse barn.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

barn n (definite singular barnet, indefinite plural barn, definite plural barna or barnene)

  1. a child

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse barn.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

barn n (definite singular barnet, indefinite plural barn or born, definite plural barna or borna)

  1. a child

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną.

NounEdit

barn n (genitive barns, plural børn)

  1. child

DescendantsEdit


Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *barną, the passive participle of *beraną; cognate with Latvian bērns (child), Lithuanian bérnas (servant); from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer-.

NounEdit

barn n (genitive barns, plural bǫrn)

  1. child

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • barn in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *barną, whence also Old English bearn, Old High German barn, Swedish barn.

NounEdit

barn n

  1. child

DeclensionEdit



Old SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną.

NounEdit

barn n

  1. child

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


PolishEdit

NounEdit

barn m inan

  1. barn (unit)

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • barn in Polish dictionaries at PWN

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish barn (child), from Old Norse barn (child), from Proto-Germanic *barną, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer-. Cognate with Danish barn, Icelandic barn, Old Saxon barn, Old High German barn, Latvian bērns (child), Lithuanian bérnas (worker) and bernẽlis (lad), a kind of participle to bära (to bear, to carry, as in childbirth).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bɑːrn/, [bɑːɳ]
  • (file)

NounEdit

barn n

  1. a child (a young person)
  2. (someone's) child, offspring (a son or daughter)
  3. a descendant (e.g. children of Abraham)
  4. a follower (e.g. God's children)
  5. (someone's) creation, invention
  6. (uncountable) barn; a unit of area in nuclear physics

DeclensionEdit

Declension of barn 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative barn barnet barn barnen
Genitive barns barnets barns barnens

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

barn f (plural barnau)

  1. opinion, view
  2. judgement, sentence

Derived termsEdit

  • barnu (to adjudge; to pass sentence)

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
barn farn marn unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.