See also: Barn and Bärn

English

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A barn (farm building) in Lithuania

Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle English barn, bern, bærn, from Old English bearn, bern, contracted forms of Old English berern, bereærn (barn, granary), compound of bere (barley) and ærn, ræn (dwelling, barn), from Proto-West Germanic *raʀn, from Proto-Germanic *razną (compare Old Norse rann), from pre-Germanic *h₁rh̥₁-s-nó-, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁erh₁- (to rest).

More at rest and barley.

For the use as a unit of surface area, see w:Barn (unit) § Etymology.

Noun

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
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barn (plural barns)

  1. (agriculture) A building, often found on a farm, used for storage or keeping animals such as cattle.
  2. (nuclear physics) A unit of surface area equal to 10−28 square metres.
  3. (informal, basketball, ice hockey) An arena.
    Maple Leaf Gardens was a grand old barn.
  4. (slang) A warm and cozy place, especially a bedroom; a roost.
Derived terms
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Translations
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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.
See also
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Verb

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barn (third-person singular simple present barns, present participle barning, simple past and past participle barned)

  1. (transitive) To lay up in a barn.
    Synonym: (obsolete) imbarn
    • 1594, William Shakespeare, Lucrece (First Quarto), London: [] Richard Field, for Iohn Harrison, [], →OCLC, line 859:
      But like still-pining Tantalus he sits / And useless barns the harvest of his wits
    • 1645, Thomas Fuller, Good Thoughts in Bad Times; Good Thoughts in Worse Times; Mixt Contemplations in Better Times, published 1863, page 165:
      Hypocrites, in like manner, so act holiness that they pass for saints before men, whose censures often barn up the chaff, and burn up the grain.

Etymology 2

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From Middle English barn, bern, from Old English bearn (child, son, offspring, progeny) and Old Norse barn (child). Doublet of bairn. Cognate to Frisian bern ("child/children"), Middle Dutch baren (child).

Noun

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barn (plural barns)

  1. (dialect, parts of Northern England) A child.
Synonyms
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Translations
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References

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Anagrams

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Breton

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Etymology

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From Proto-Celtic *barnati (proclaim). Cognate with Cornish barna.

Verb

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barn

  1. (transitive) To judge.

Inflection

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Conjugation

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Derived terms

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Danish

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Etymology

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From Old Danish barn, from Old Norse barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną. Compare English bairn.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /barn/, /b̥ɑːˀn/, [pɑ̈ˀn]

Noun

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barn n (singular definite barnet, plural indefinite børn)

  1. child (immature human)
    Dette er ikke et passende sted for børn.
    This is not a fitting place for children.
  2. child (human offspring)
    Mine børn er alle flyttet hjemmefra.
    My children have all moved out.

Usage notes

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In compounds: barn-, barne-, barns- or børne-.

Declension

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Derived terms

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References

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Faroese

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Etymology

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From Old Norse barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną, the passive participle of *beraną; cognate with Latvian bērns (child), Lithuanian bérnas (servant); from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer-.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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barn n (genitive singular barns, plural børn)

  1. child

Declension

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Declension of barn
n5 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative barn barnið børn børnini
accusative barn barnið børn børnini
dative barni barninum børnum børnunum
genitive barns barnsins barna barnanna

French

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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barn m (plural barns)

  1. (physics) barn (unit)

Gothic

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Romanization

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barn

  1. Romanization of 𐌱𐌰𐍂𐌽

Icelandic

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Etymology

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From Old Norse barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [ˈpartn̥], (colloquial) [ˈpatn̥], (southeastern) [ˈparn]
  • Rhymes: -artn, -atn

Noun

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barn n (genitive singular barns, nominative plural börn)

  1. child

Declension

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Derived terms

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Italian

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Etymology

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Unadapted borrowing from English barn.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈbarn/
  • Rhymes: -arn
  • Hyphenation: bàrn

Noun

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barn m (invariable)

  1. (nuclear physics) barn (a unit of surface area)

Further reading

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  • barn in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Middle English

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Old English bearn, from Proto-West Germanic *barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną.

Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /barn/, /baːrn/, /bɛrn/

Noun

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barn (plural barnes or barnen)

  1. A member of one's immediate offspring or progeny.
  2. A child, youth, or baby.
    • c. 1335-1361, William of Palerne (MS. King's College 13), folio 6, recto, lines 198-199; republished as W. W. Skeat, editor, The Romance of William of Palerne[1], London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co., 1867, →OCLC, page 12:
      Hit tidde after on a time · as tellus our bokes / as þis bold barn his beſtes · blybeliche keped []
      Afterwards, as our books record, it happened one day that / while this brave child was peacefully looking after his animals []
  3. A person; a member of humanity.
  4. A younger soldier or fighter.
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Descendants
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  • English: barn (obsolete, dialectal)
  • Geordie English: bairn
  • Scots: bairn
  • Yola: barrn
References
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Etymology 2

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Noun

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barn

  1. Alternative form of bern (barn)

Norwegian Bokmål

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Etymology

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From Old Norse barn (child), from Proto-Germanic *barną (child), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer- (to bear, carry).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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barn n (definite singular barnet, indefinite plural barn, definite plural barna or barnene)

  1. child

Derived terms

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References

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Norwegian Nynorsk

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Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Old Norse barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną (child), ultimately from the Proto-Indo-European root *bʰer- (to bear, carry). The plural form born is from the Old Norse u-umlauted form bǫrn. This umlaut can also be seen in Icelandic börn and Danish and Faroese børn.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /baːrn/, /baːɳ/
  • (palatal N) IPA(key): /baːɲ/ (Can we verify(+) this pronunciation?)

Noun

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barn n (definite singular barnet, indefinite plural barn or born, definite plural barna or borna)

  1. child

Inflection

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Derived terms

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  • bera (to bear, carry, verb)

References

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Old Danish

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Etymology

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From Old Norse barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną.

Noun

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barn n (genitive barns, plural børn)

  1. child

Descendants

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Old High German

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Etymology

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From Proto-West Germanic *barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną, whence also Old Saxon barn, Old English bearn, Old Norse barn.

Noun

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barn n

  1. child

Declension

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Old Norse

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Etymology

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From Proto-Germanic *barną, the passive participle of *beraną; cognate with Latvian bērns (child), Lithuanian bérnas (servant); from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer-.

Noun

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barn n (genitive barns, plural bǫrn)

  1. child

Declension

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Descendants

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References

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  • barn”, in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old Saxon

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Etymology

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From Proto-West Germanic *barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną, whence also Old English bearn, Old High German barn, Old Norse barn.

Noun

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barn n

  1. child

Declension

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Old Swedish

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Old Norse barn, from Proto-Germanic *barną.

Noun

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barn n

  1. child

Declension

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The template Template:gmq-osw-decl-noun-a-n does not use the parameter(s):
acc_pl=barn, børn
acc_pl_d=barnin, børnin
nom_pl=barn, børn
nom_pl_d=barnin, børnin
Please see Module:checkparams for help with this warning.

Descendants

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Polish

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Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology

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Borrowed from English barn.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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barn m inan

  1. (nuclear physics) barn (a unit of surface area equal to 10−28 square metres)

Declension

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Further reading

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  • barn in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Spanish

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Noun

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barn m (plural barns)

  1. (physics) barn

Further reading

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Swedish

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Etymology

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From Old Swedish barn (child), from Old Norse barn (child), from Proto-Germanic *barną, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer-. Cognate with Danish barn, Icelandic barn, Old Saxon barn, Old High German barn, Latvian bērns (child), Lithuanian bérnas (worker) and bernẽlis (lad), a kind of participle to bära (to bear, to carry, as in childbirth).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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barn n

  1. a child (young person)
    Barnen leker
    The children are playing
    Han är bara ett barn / Han är bara barnet
    He is only a child ("Bara vara barnet" (literally, "only be the child") is an alternative way to express the same thing)
  2. a child (son or daughter)
    Du är mitt barn
    You are my child
    adoptivbarn
    adopted children
  3. (figuratively) a child (descendant, indirectly, for example in religious contexts)
  4. (figuratively) a child (follower, like above)
    Guds barn
    God's children
  5. (figuratively) a child (someone's creation or the like)
  6. (uncountable) barn (a unit of area in nuclear physics)

Declension

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Declension of barn 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative barn barnet barn barnen
Genitive barns barnets barns barnens

Synonyms

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Derived terms

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See also

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References

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Welsh

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Etymology

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From Proto-Celtic *barnati from Proto-Indo-European *gʷerH-.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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barn f (plural barnau)

  1. opinion, view
  2. judgement, sentence

Derived terms

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Mutation

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Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
barn farn marn unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.