EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Arabic بِنْت(bint, girl, daughter), from Proto-Semitic *bint-, used to denote a patronym.

The term entered the British lexicon during the occupation of Egypt at the end of the 19th century, where it was adopted by British soldiers to mean "girlfriend" or "bit on the side". Its register varies from that of the harsher bitch to being affectionate, the latter more commonly associated with the West Midlands. The term was used in British armed forces and the London area synonymously with bird in its slang usage (and sometimes brass) from at least the 1950s. (In the Tyneside shipping industry, particularly in Laygate, in South Shields, the term may have been adopted earlier, from the Yemeni community which had existed there since the 1890s.[1])

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: bĭnt, IPA(key): /bɪnt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪnt

NounEdit

bint (plural bints)

  1. (Britain, derogatory) A woman, a girl.
    Tell that bint to get herself in here now!
    • Austin Powers (film):
      Don't you remember the Crimbo din-din we had with the grotty Scots bint?
    • Monty Python and the Holy Grail:
      If I went round saying I was an emperor just because some moistened bint had lobbed a scimitar at me, they'd put me away!

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


BavarianEdit

NounEdit

bint ?

  1. (Sappada, Sauris, Timau) wind

ReferencesEdit

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien.

CimbrianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German wint, from Old High German wint (wind). Cognate with German Wind.

NounEdit

bint m (plural bintediminutive bintle)

  1. (Luserna, Sette Comuni) wind
    Dar bint plaazet.The wind is blowing.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • “bint” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien
  • “bint” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Crimean TatarEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German Binde.

NounEdit

bint

  1. bind, bandage

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary]‎[2], Simferopol: Dolya, →ISBN

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch bint, from older gebint.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bint n (plural binten)

  1. heavy wooden beam, especially as part of a roof
  2. several beams, forming the structure of a building or a roof
    Synonym: gebint

MalteseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic بِنْت(bint).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bint f (plural ulied)

  1. daughter
    Coordinate term: iben

Usage notesEdit

  • The singular of this word is predominantly used in the construct state, that is with a possessive suffix or a following noun. This is similar to the words ħu (brother) and oħt (sister), though with bint and iben this restriction is only a tendency, not a definite rule.
  • The plural ulied is gender-neutral and thus means “children” in the sense of “offspring of either sex”. The etymological plural bniet now means “girls” and is used as a plural of tifla. In order to specify the feminine in the plural one says ulied bniet (daughters, literally children girls).

InflectionEdit


MòchenoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German wint, from Old High German wint, from Proto-Germanic *windaz. Cognate with German Wind, English wind.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bint m

  1. wind

ReferencesEdit

  • Anthony R. Rowley, Liacht as de sproch: Grammatica della lingua mòchena Deutsch-Fersentalerisch, TEMI, 2003.