See also: Bouk

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English bouk, from Old English būc (belly, stomach, pitcher), from Proto-Germanic *būkaz (belly, body), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰōw- (to blow, swell). Cognate with Scots bouk, bowk, buik (body, carcass), Dutch buik (belly), German Bauch (belly), Swedish buk (belly, abdomen), Icelandic búkur (torso). See also bucket.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bouk (plural bouks)

  1. (Britain dialectal or obsolete) The belly.
  2. (Britain dialectal) The trunk or torso of the body, hence the body itself.
  3. (Britain dialectal) The carcass of a slaughtered animal.

AnagramsEdit


MarshalleseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bouk

  1. a dragonfly

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English būc, from Proto-Germanic *būkaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bouk (plural boukes or bouken)

  1. belly, stomach
  2. body (especially a corpse)
  3. The main portion of a structure

DescendantsEdit

  • English: bouk (obsolete)
  • Scots: bouk, bowk, buik

ReferencesEdit