See also: Breme, brème, brême, and Brême

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English brem, breme, from Old English brēme (famous, glorious, noble), from Proto-Germanic *brōmiz (famous). Cognate with Latin fremō (I murmur; I roar), Ancient Greek βρέμω (brémō, I roar), Polish brzmieć (to be heard).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

breme

  1. (obsolete) Stormy, tempestuous, fierce.
    • late 14th century, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Knight's Tale:
      He was war of Arcite and Palamon / Þat fouȝten breme as it were bores two.
    • 1579, Edmund Spenser, The Shepheardes Calender:
      Let me, ah! lette me in your folds ye lock, / Ere the breme winter breede you greater griefe.
    • 1748, James Thomson, The Castle of Indolence:
      The same to him glad Summer or the Winter breme.
      Mallory, "Le Morte d'Arthur":
      "So upon the morn there came Sir Gawaine as brim (breme) as any boar, with a great spear in his hand."
    • (Can we date this quote by Drayton and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      From the septentrion cold, in the breme freezing air.
  2. (obsolete) Famous; renowned; well-known.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wright to this entry?)

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

breme m (plural bremi)

  1. (zoology, ichthyology) bream (of genus Abramis)

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *brōmiz.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

brēme

  1. (poetic) famous, renowned, glorious

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: brem, breme

Serbo-CroatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *bermę.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /brême/
  • Hyphenation: bre‧me

NounEdit

brȅme n (Cyrillic spelling бре̏ме)

  1. burden, load

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit