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The common bream, Abramis brama

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English breme, from Old French breme, bresme, braisme, brasme (compare modern French brème), from Frankish *brahsma, *brahsima (compare Dutch brasem), from West Germanic *brahsmō (compare Old High German brahsma, brahsmo, brahsina, brehsina > modern German Brasse, Brachse (bream)), from Proto-Germanic *brahsmǭ, *brahsinō, *brahsmaz (bream), perhaps from Proto-Germanic *brehwanaz (shining, glittery, sparkly), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerek- (to shine) (see braid (verb)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bream (plural bream or breams)

  1. A European fresh-water cyprinoid fish of the genus Abramis, little valued as food. Several species are known.
  2. (Britain) A species in that genus, Abramis brama.
  3. An American fresh-water fish, of various species of Lepomis and allied genera, which are also called sunfishes and pondfishes.
  4. A marine sparoid fish of the genus Pagellus, and allied genera. See sea bream.
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Etymology 2Edit

Compare broom, and German brennen (as in ein Schiff brennen).

VerbEdit

bream (third-person singular simple present breams, present participle breaming, simple past and past participle breamed)

  1. (nautical) To clean (e.g. a ship's bottom of clinging shells, seaweed, etc.) by the application of fire and scraping.

AnagramsEdit