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EnglishEdit

 
A pair of brogues

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Irish bróg (boot, shoe). The "accent" sense may instead be derived from Irish barróg (a hold (on the tongue)).

NounEdit

brogue (plural brogues)

  1. A strong dialectal accent. In Ireland it used to be a term for Irish spoken with a strong English accent, but gradually changed to mean English spoken with a strong Irish accent as English control of Ireland gradually increased and Irish waned as the standard language.
    • 1978, Louis L'Amour, Fair Blows the Wind, Bantam Books, page 62:
      I had no doubt he knew where I was from, for I had the brogue, although not much of it.
    • 2010, Clare Vanderpool, Moon Over Manifest, Random House, page 187:
      “No-man's-land.” The words were spoken in a deep voice filled with salt water and brogue.
  2. A strong Oxford shoe, with ornamental perforations and wing tips.
  3. (dated) A heavy shoe of untanned leather.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

brogue (third-person singular simple present brogues, present participle broguing, simple past and past participle brogued)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To speak with a brogue (accent).
  2. (intransitive) To walk.
  3. (transitive) To kick.
  4. (transitive) To punch a hole in, as with an awl.

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Possibly from French brouiller.

VerbEdit

brogue (third-person singular simple present brogues, present participle broguing, simple past and past participle brogued)

  1. (dialectal) to fish for eels by disturbing the waters

AnagramsEdit