EnglishEdit

 
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Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English accent, from Middle French accent, from Old French acent, from Latin accentus, past participle of accinō (sing to, sing along). The word accent had been borrowed into Old English already, but was lost and reborrowed in Middle English.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

accent (countable and uncountable, plural accents)

  1. (linguistics) A higher-pitched or stronger (louder or longer) articulation of a particular syllable of a word or phrase in order to distinguish it from the others or to emphasize it.
    Synonym: stress
    Hyponyms: stress, stress accent, pitch, pitch accent
    In the word "careful", the accent is placed on the first syllable.
  2. (figuratively) Emphasis or importance in general.
    At this hotel, the accent is on luxury.
  3. (orthography) A mark or character used in writing, in order to indicate the place of the spoken accent, or to indicate the nature or quality of the vowel marked.
    The name Cézanne is written with an acute accent.
  4. Modulation of the voice in speaking; the manner of speaking or pronouncing; a peculiar or characteristic modification of the voice, expressing emotion; tone.
    • c. 1603–1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of King Lear”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act II, scene ii]:
      I know, sir, I am no flatterer: he that beguiled you in a plain accent was a plain knave; which for my part I will not be, though I should win your displeasure to entreat me to 't.
    • 1696, Matthew Prior, “From Celia to Damon”, in Poems on Several Occasions:
      The tender Accent of a Woman's Cry / Will pass unheard, will unregarded die;
    • 1815, Jane Austen, Emma, volume I, chapter 15:
      And he repeated her words with such assurance of accent, such boastful pretence of amazement, that she could not help replying with quickness …
  5. (linguistics, sociolinguistics) The distinctive manner of pronouncing a language associated with a particular region, social group, etc., whether of a native speaker or a foreign speaker; the phonetic and phonological aspects of a dialect.
    a foreign accent
    a broad Irish accent
    a hint of a German accent
    1. (informal, sometimes proscribed) A manner of pronunciation suggesting that the speaker is from a different region; a foreign accent.
      My professor's accent is so thick that it's difficult to understand her lectures.
      She spoke with a strong accent that betrayed her southern roots.
      I was surprised to learn that he was an immigrant, as he spoke without any accent.
      • 2015 November 14, Adam Gopnik, quoting Célia, “Terror Strikes in Paris”, in The New Yorker[1], archived from the original on 2022-12-19:
        They were all Middle Eastern types but spoke French without any accent.
      • 2016 June 8, Tyler Mears, “I used to hide my Valleys accent in case people thought I was less intelligent - which was completely stupid”, in WalesOnline[2], archived from the original on 2023-01-10:
        Growing up in the Rhondda and having a strong accent was never a problem for me and my voice never really stood out from the crowd.
      • 2018 January 24, Lakshine Sathiyanathan, Lisa Xing, quoting Mariya Miloshevych, “Why some people try to chip away at their accent”, in CBC News[3], archived from the original on 2022-12-09:
        It's really hard to get in an audition room when you have an accent. Rather than being treated as the other people, you are falling into a category of foreigners who can't really maintain the role.
      • 2020 December 30, Christi Carras, quoting Rishi Maharaj, “'Schitt's Creek' star Rizwan Manji defends his character's Indian accent”, in Los Angeles Times[4], archived from the original on 2022-12-09:
        Why go to the effort of writing in a character with an Indian name played by an Indian actor whose main personality trait is that he is stupid and has an accent?
      • 2022 March 22, Elise Hu, Jinae West, Jordana Hochman, Andrea Gutierrez, “Rejecting assimilation in 'You Sound Like a White Girl'”, in NPR[5], archived from the original on 2022-12-09:
        But over the years, even after perfecting "accent-less" English, graduating from college, getting a job at Goldman Sachs, and becoming an American citizen, Arce still felt like she didn't belong.
    2. (sign languages) A distinctive manner of producing a sign language, such as someone who does not normally use a certain sign language might have when using it.
      • 2008, Jeremy Linn Brunson, The Practice and Organization of Sign Language, page 76:
        I believe I still retain some of my hearing accent when I use American Sign Language.
      • 2015 November 5, Nina Porzucki, The World[6], archived from the original on 2022-12-07:
        Cheesesteaks, Peanut Chews, Tastykakes, oh yeah, the Liberty Bell — there's so much to love about Philadelphia, but one of the best things about the city of Brotherly Love is the accent. We're not talking about spoken English — we're talking about American Sign Language.
  6. A word; a significant tone or sound.
  7. (usually plural only) Expressions in general; speech.
    • 1697, Virgil, “Pastoral 3”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], →OCLC:
      Winds! on your wings to Heaven her accents bear, / Such words as Heaven alone is fit to hear.
  8. (prosody, poetry) Stress laid on certain syllables of a verse.
  9. (music) A regularly recurring stress upon the tone to mark the beginning, and, more feebly, the third part of the measure.
  10. (music) A special emphasis of a tone, even in the weaker part of the measure.
  11. (music) A mark used to represent this special emphasis.
     
    The third and fourth symbols are accents (marks used to represent special emphasis in music).
  12. (music) The rhythmical accent, which marks phrases and sections of a period.
  13. (mathematics) A prime symbol.
  14. Emphasis laid on a part of an artistic design or composition; an emphasized detail, in particular a detail in sharp contrast to its surroundings.
    accent color
  15. A very small gemstone set into a piece of jewellery.
  16. (archaic) Utterance.
Usage notesEdit

The word "accent" is often used specifically to refer to manners of speech that differ significantly from the local standard or one's personal speech.

Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle French accenter, from Old French accenter, from Latin accentō, from accentus.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

accent (third-person singular simple present accents, present participle accenting, simple past and past participle accented)

  1. (transitive) To express the accent of vocally; to utter with accent.
  2. (transitive) To mark emphatically; to emphasize; to accentuate; to make prominent.
  3. (transitive) To mark with written accents.
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin accentus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

accent m (plural accents)

  1. accent

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From French accent, from Latin accentus, a calque of Ancient Greek προσῳδία (prosōidía, prosody, accent).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

accent c (singular definite accenten, plural indefinite accenter)

  1. accent (a voice influenced by dialect or another language)
  2. accent (a mark on a letter (like grave or acute))
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin accentus, a calque of Ancient Greek προσῳδία (prosōidía, prosody, accent).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

accent c (singular definite accenten, plural indefinite accenter)

  1. (linguistics) accent (stress or a pitch in articulation)
  2. accent (emphasis)
  3. accent (a mark on a letter (like grave or acute))
InflectionEdit

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch accent, ultimately from Latin accentus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

accent n (plural accenten, diminutive accentje n)

  1. (linguistics) accent (distinctive pronunciation of a language; phonetic and phonological aspects of a lect)
  2. A notably deviant or disprivileged pronunciation of a language.
  3. (linguistics) accent (contrasting articulation to express emphasis)
  4. (orthography) accent (symbol to indicate spoken accent or the nature of a vowel)
    Synonym: accentteken
  5. (music) accent (stress or emphasis)
  6. (music) A mark that indicates musical accent.
    Synonym: accentteken

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: aksent
  • Indonesian: aksen
  • Papiamentu: aksènt

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Middle French accent, from Old French acent, borrowed from Latin accentus (accent, tone, accentuation).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

accent m (plural accents)

  1. accent, manner or tone of speech
    Elle parle anglais avec un fort accent français.She speaks English with a strong French accent.
    Aux États-Unis, son accent français ne manque jamais d'attirer l'attention des femmes.
    In the United States, his French accent never fails to attract women's attention.
  2. (linguistics) an accent symbol
    Hyponyms: accent aigu, accent circonflexe, accent grave
  3. (linguistics) accent, stress
  4. (music) strain, section
  5. emphasis, focus
    L'accent est mis sur les quantités plutôt que sur les qualités.Emphasis is placed on the quantities rather than the qualities.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French acent, from Latin accentus, from ad + cantus (song).

NounEdit

accent m (plural accents)

  1. (linguistics) accent, stress

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French accent (accent, manner or tone of speech), from Middle French accent, from Old French acent, from Latin accentus (accent, tone, accentuation), past participle of accinō (sing to, sing along), from both ad- (to), from ad (to, towards), from Proto-Italic *ad (toward, to, on, up to, for), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éd (to, at) + and from canō (I sing, recite, play), from Proto-Italic *kanō (to sing), from Proto-Indo-European *keh₂n- (to sing).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

accent

  1. Alternative spelling of aksent (accent)
  2. Only used in accent aigu (acute accent)
  3. Only used in accent circonflexe (circumflex)
  4. Only used in accent grave (grave accent)

ReferencesEdit

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin accentus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

accent m

  1. accent
  2. diacritic

DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

PaliEdit

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

accent

  1. present active participle of acceti

DeclensionEdit

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French accent.

NounEdit

accent n (plural accente)

  1. emphasis
  2. accent

DeclensionEdit

ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

accent (plural accents)

  1. accent

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Latin accentus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /akːˈsɛnːt/, /akːˈsaŋː/

NounEdit

accent c

  1. an accent, an emphasis, a stress (in articulation)
  2. an accent, a mark on a letter (grave or acute)
  3. an accent, a voice influenced by dialect or another language

DeclensionEdit

Declension of accent 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative accent accenten accenter accenterna
Genitive accents accentens accenters accenternas