See also: Bund

English

edit

Etymology 1

edit

From German Bund (alliance, league). Doublet of Bund, bond, and band.

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

bund (plural bunds)

  1. A league or confederacy; especially the confederation of German states.
  2. A group of foreign sympathizers of Nazi Germany, most notoriously before and during World War II.
Translations
edit

Etymology 2

edit

From Hindustani بند / बंद (band), from Classical Persian بند (band).

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

bund (plural bunds)

  1. A secondary enclosure, typically consisting of a wall or berm, which surrounds a tank or fluid-handling mechanism, intended to contain any spills or leaks.
    • 2024 July 20, “The Buncefield investigation - second progress report”, in Buncefield investigation[1] (PDF), archived from the original on 2006-04-14, page 4:
      The most important of these [secondary containment] provisions are bunds, which are enclosures capable of holding liquids that may escape from the vessels and pipes within the bund wall.
  2. (India) A perennial ("wet") or seasonal ("dry") pond constructed in a depression and in which fish are stored, typically for breeding.
  3. An embankment.
    • 1875, John Thomson, The Straits of Malacca, Indo-China, and China, page 408:
      It is pleasant to see the Chinese domestics and their families; or native ladies dressed in silks, their glossy hair held in by a broad black velvet band with a spray of pearls in front, being propelled along the bund in their hand-carts; but they are not used among Europeans, excepting after dark.
    • 2021 November 17, Mark Rand, “Reconnecting rail freight to S&C quarries”, in RAIL, number 944, page 54:
      A massive opening in the bund (embankment), specifically there to screen the quarry from view, was needed, along with a Midland Railway-style bridge carrying a historic bridleway.
    • 2022 March 23, Philip Haigh, “Network News: Rogue earthwork triggered fatal washout at Carmont”, in RAIL, number 953, page 6:
      RAIB said it could not find evidence to explain who built the earth bank, known as a bund, or why it was built.

Verb

edit

bund (third-person singular simple present bunds, present participle bunding, simple past and past participle bunded)

  1. To provide berms or other secondary enclosures to guard against accidental fluid spills within.
    • 2020 December 1 (last accessed), “Plant Room Waterproofing & Tanking”, in RIW[2]:
      Plant room floors are generally bunded and/or waterproofed to contain any leaks or spillages of liquids and fluids from faulty tanks, plant or pipe work.

Etymology 3

edit

Variant of bandh, from Hindi बंध (bandh); see that entry for more. Doublet of etymology 2 above.

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

bund (plural bunds)

  1. (India) Alternative form of bandh
Derived terms
edit

References

edit

Danish

edit

Etymology

edit

From Old Norse botn, from Proto-Germanic *butmaz.

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

bund c (singular definite bunden, plural indefinite bunde)

  1. bottom (the lowest part)

Inflection

edit

Derived terms

edit

Verb

edit

bund

  1. imperative of bunde

Romanian

edit

Etymology

edit

Borrowed from German Bund.

Noun

edit

bund n (plural bunduri)

  1. bund

Declension

edit