buzzword

See also: buzz-word and buzz word

EnglishEdit

 
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Examples (English words often considered buzzwords)

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

U.S. 1970s from buzz +‎ word.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbʌzwɜː(ɹ)d/
  • (file)

NounEdit

buzzword (plural buzzwords)

  1. (derogatory) A word drawn from, or imitative of, technical jargon, used more to impress others than to convey meaning.
    Their salespeople know all the right buzzwords, but they can’t really help you solve your problems.
    • 1972 May 14, Marylyn Bender, “Harvard's Brahmin Radical”, in The New York Times[1], ISSN 0362-4331:
      Ideology is a [George Cabot] Lodge buzzword, as they say in business schools, the first word that sends many executives and students who would emulate them, into fury.
    • 2018 June 19, Gideon Lewis-Kraus, “Inside the Crypto World's Biggest Scandal”, in Wired[2], ISSN 1059-1028:
      There is great confusion and debate about what a blockchain even is—some people argue it’s become a meaningless buzzword—but the standard definition describes a shared, decentralized, cryptographically secure, immutable digital ledger.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Dutch: buzzword, buzzwoord
  • German: Buzzword
  • Hebrew: זמזומילה(zimzumilá) (calque)
  • Portuguese: buzzword

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unadapted borrowing from English buzzword.

NounEdit

buzzword m or f (plural buzzwords)

  1. buzzword (fashionable technical jargon)