See also: calaminé

English edit

Etymology edit

From French calamine, from Medieval Latin calamīna, from Latin cadmīa, ultimately from Ancient Greek Κᾰδμείᾱ (Kadmeíā), from Κάδμος (Kádmos, Cadmus) + -εια (-eia, -ia: forming related substances). Doublet of cadmia, calaminaris, and lapis calaminaris.

Noun edit

calamine (usually uncountable, plural calamines)

  1. (inorganic chemistry) Synonym of smithsonite, a pink form of zinc oxide (mainly zinc carbonate ZnCO3) formed as a byproduct of zinc sublimation, now used in skin lotions.
    • 1959, “Poison Ivy”, Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller (lyrics), performed by The Coasters:
      Poison Ivy, Lord,'ll make you itch
      You're gonna need an ocean
      Of calamine lotion
      You'll be scratchin' like a hound
      The minute you start to mess around
    • 2022, Ling Ma, “Tomorrow”, in Bliss Montage, New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, →ISBN:
      For Secret Santa two years before, she had gifted him a bottle of calamine lotion.
  2. (mineralogy) Synonym of hemimorphite, an orthorhombic-pyramidal mineral containing zinc.

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Verb edit

calamine (third-person singular simple present calamines, present participle calamining, simple past and past participle calamined)

  1. (transitive) To coat or treat with calamine.

Anagrams edit

French edit

Etymology edit

FromMedieval Latin calamīna, from Latin cadmī̆a, ultimately from Ancient Greek Κᾰδμείᾱ (Kadmeíā), from Κάδμος (Kádmos, Cadmus) + -εια (-eia, -ia: forming related substances).

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Noun edit

calamine f (plural calamines)

  1. calamine, form of zinc oxide formed as a byproduct of sublimation
  2. (figuratively) carbon residue formed as a byproduct in two-stroke engines

Descendants edit

  • English: calamine

Further reading edit

Italian edit

Noun edit

calamine f

  1. plural of calamina

Anagrams edit