capriccio

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Italian capriccio. Doublet of caprice.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

capriccio (plural capriccios or capricci)

  1. A sudden and unexpected or fantastic motion; a caper (from same etymology, see below); a gambol; a prank, a trick.
  2. A fantastical thing or work; a caprice.
  3. A type of landscape painting that places particular works of architecture in an unusual setting.
    • 2005, Alan Hollinghurst, The Line of Beauty, (Bloomsbury Publishing, paperback, page 5)
      Above the drawing-room fireplace there was a painting by Guardi, a capriccio of Venice in a gilt rococo frame []
  4. A piece of music, usually fairly free in form and of a lively character.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From capo +‎ riccio, literally “curly head”. People believed that curly hair was a sign for a capricious and unruly character.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

capriccio m (plural capricci)

  1. whim, fancy, caprice, quirk
  2. tantrum
    Synonym: bizza
  3. (music, painting) capriccio

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • French: caprice (see there for further descendants)
  • Spanish: capricho (see there for further descendants)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “capriccio” in: Alberto Nocentini, Alessandro Parenti, “l'Etimologico — Vocabolario della lingua italiana”, Le Monnier, 2010, →ISBN