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EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Shortening of capriole.

NounEdit

caper (plural capers)

  1. A playful leap or jump.
  2. A jump while dancing.
  3. A prank or practical joke.
  4. (usually in plural) Playful behaviour.
  5. A crime, especially an elaborate heist, or a narrative about such a crime.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

caper (third-person singular simple present capers, present participle capering, simple past and past participle capered)

  1. To leap or jump about in a sprightly or playful manner.
  2. To jump as part of a dance.
  3. To engage in playful behaviour.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch kaper.

NounEdit

caper (plural capers)

  1. A vessel formerly used by the Dutch; privateer.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Latin capparis.

NounEdit

caper (plural capers)

  1. The pungent grayish green flower bud of the European and Oriental caper (Capparis spinosa), which is pickled and eaten.
  2. A plant of the genus Capparis.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Shortening of capercaillie.

NounEdit

caper (plural capers)

  1. (Scotland) The capercaillie.
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

English cap

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

caper

  1. (finance) to cap (set a limit to)
  2. (sports) to cap (award a player a cap for playing for their national team)

ConjugationEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *kápros (buck, he-goat); see also Old Norse hafr (he-goat), Old English hæfr, Welsh gafr, Old Irish gabor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

caper m (genitive caprī); second declension

  1. a male goat
    Synonym: hircus
  2. vocative singular of caper

DeclensionEdit

Second declension, nominative singular in -er.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative caper caprī
Genitive caprī caprōrum
Dative caprō caprīs
Accusative caprum caprōs
Ablative caprō caprīs
Vocative caper caprī

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • caper in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • caper in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • caper in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • caper in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • caper in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin capere, present active infinitive of capiō.

VerbEdit

caper

  1. to seize

ConjugationEdit

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

caper m

  1. indefinite plural of cape