cardoon

EnglishEdit

 
a cardoon
Cynara cardunculus
 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French cardon, from Medieval Latin cardon, singular form of cardō, from Latin carduus (thistle). Doublet of chard.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kɑː(ɹ)ˈduːn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːn

NounEdit

cardoon (plural cardoons)

  1. Cynara cardunculus, a prickly perennial plant related to the artichoke which has leaf stalks eaten as a vegetable.
    • 1611, Randle Cotgrave, A dictionarie of the French and English tongues[1]:
      Means: m. Void, and emptie places between beds in gardens, reserved for speciall hearbes; such are the spaces left for Cardoons betweene rowes of Onyons.
    • 1839, Charles Darwin, The Voyage of the Beagle:
      As I have already said, I nowhere saw the cardoon south of the Salado; but it is probable that in proportion as that country becomes inhabited, the cardoon will extend its limits.
    • 2001, Clifford A. Wright, Mediterranean Vegetables: A Cook's ABC of Vegetables and Their Preparation[2]:
      In the sixteenth century, Ruellius speaks of the cardoon as a food that was appreciated as asparagus is today.

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