See also: cardò and cardó

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin cardō (hinge). Doublet of kern.

NounEdit

cardo (plural cardines)

  1. (zoology) The basal joint of the maxilla in insects
  2. (zoology) The hinge of a bivalve shell.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for “cardo” in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

 
Cardo

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Attested since circa 1300. From Old Galician and Old Portuguese, from Latin carduus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cardo m (plural cardos)

  1. thistle
    • c1300, R. Martínez López (ed.), General Estoria. Versión gallega del siglo XIV. Oviedo: Publicacións de Archivum, page 7:
      mays a terra mays lle criaua cardos et espyñas et outras eruas et cousas danosas que o estoruauam que [nõ] o que el semẽtaua
      but the earth did not produce but thistles and thorns and other plants and weeds that would rather hinder him than that that he sowed

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • cardo” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2016.
  • cardo” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • cardo” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • cardo” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkar.do/
  • Rhymes: -ardo
  • Hyphenation: càr‧do

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin carduus (thistle).

NounEdit

cardo m (plural cardi)

  1. thistle
  2. teasel
  3. implement for carding wool with thistle-like bristles, card
    Synonym: scardasso
Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

cardo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of cardare

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin cardō (hinge, astronomical pole), hence, north-south line.

NounEdit

cardo m (plural cardi)

  1. the principal north-south street in Roman cities or encampments

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Uncertain. Traditionally related to Ancient Greek κράδη (krádē, twig, spray; swing, crane in the drama), but unlikely as the concordant sense of swing is metaphorical and likely too recent. Or from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kerd- (to move, sway, swing, jump) and so cognate with English har (hinge). Compare in any case Old High German scerdo (hinge).

NounEdit

cardō m (genitive cardinis); third declension

  1. hinge (of a door or gate), usually a pivot and socket in Roman times.
  2. (by extension) a tenon, mortice, or socket
  3. A street, that ran north-south, in a Roman town or military camp
  4. (figuratively) turning point, critical moment or action
  5. (astronomy) a pole
DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cardō cardinēs
Genitive cardinis cardinum
Dative cardinī cardinibus
Accusative cardinem cardinēs
Ablative cardine cardinibus
Vocative cardō cardinēs
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • French: carne, charnière
  • Italian: cardine, cardo
  • Spanish: cárdine
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Variant form of carduus (wild thistle, artichoke); see also cardus, cardunculus.

NounEdit

cardō m (genitive cardōnis or cardinis); third declension

  1. (Medieval Latin) thistle or some similar plant
DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (two different stems).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cardō cardinēs
cardōnēs
Genitive cardinis
cardōnis
cardinum
cardōnum
Dative cardinī
cardōnī
cardinibus
cardōnibus
Accusative cardinem
cardōnem
cardinēs
cardōnēs
Ablative cardine
cardōne
cardinibus
cardōnibus
Vocative cardō cardinēs
cardōnēs
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • cardo”, in Charlton T[homas] Lewis; Charles [Lancaster] Short (1879) [] A New Latin Dictionary [], New York, N.Y.; Cincinnati, Ohio; Chicago, Ill.: American Book Company; Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  • cardo”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cardo in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • cardo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • the pole: vertex caeli, axis caeli, cardo caeli
  • cardo”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cardo”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin carduus.

NounEdit

cardo m (plural cardos)

  1. thistle (plant)

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkaɾdo/, [ˈkaɾ.ð̞o]
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin carduus.

NounEdit

cardo m (plural cardos)

  1. thistle
  2. cardoon (plant)
  3. (Spain) prickly customer
  4. (Spain) butt ugly person
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

cardo

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of cardar.

Further readingEdit