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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese carioca.

NounEdit

carioca (plural cariocas)

  1. A sideways step in which one leg crosses over the other.
    • 1982, Arthur J. Helfet, Disorders of the knee, page 388:
      In the final phase, the athlete works in non-cleated shoes on starts, stops, jumps, rounded side-step cuts, and crossover cuts, advancing to hard 90° cuts, and running tighter and tighter figures-of-eight. Defensive backs run sideways and backward and perform carioca (crossover) steps.
    • 2006, Michael L. Voight, ‎Barbara J. Hoogenboom, ‎& William E. Prentice, Musculoskeletal Interventions: Techniques for Therapeutic Exercise, →ISBN:
      These included the cocontraction maneuver (a shuffling maneuver around a semicircle while tethered to surgical tubing), a carioca (crossover stepping), and a shuttle run (an acceleration and deceleration test).
    • 2007, Walter R. Frontera, Clinical Sports Medicine: Medical Management and Rehabilitation, →ISBN:
      Leg press, squat, circle running, figure eights, single-leg hops, vertical jumps, lateral bounds, one-legged long jumps, and carioca (crossover walking) are some examples.
  2. Alternative form of Carioca
    • 2010, Ruy Castro, Rio de Janeiro: Carnival under Fire, →ISBN:
      But, for someone looking at it objectively, the relationship is a deceptive one – because at the same time as cariocas can't be seen working (shut up as they are in offices, government institutions and commercial establishments), everyone can see cariocas not working.
    • 2011, Robert Minhinnick, The Keys of Babylon, →ISBN:
      Or he might go to Rio. Rio with its white sand. He knew a rhyme about Rio, its thieving cariocas who wore sparkling wedding dresses.
    • 2012, Ade Asefeso, CEO Guide to Doing Business in Brazil, →ISBN:
      Even though cariocas are very professional they tend to be more laid back and easy going than business people from Sao Paulo. You can notice this as soon as you talk to a carioca.

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Portuguese carioca.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

carioca m or f (plural cariocas)

  1. of, from or relating to the city of Rio de Janeiro

NounEdit

carioca m or f (plural cariocas)

  1. an inhabitant of the city of Rio de Janeiro

NounEdit

carioca f (plural cariocas)

  1. young or immature hake (Merluccius merluccius)

ReferencesEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

carioca (invariable)

  1. of or relating to the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

NounEdit

carioca m or f (invariable)

  1. an inhabitant of the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  2. carioca (dance)

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Tupi. Several theories exist:

  • kari (white man) and oka (house), "the house of the white man".[1]
  • From Kariók or Karióg, name of an old Tupi village, kariîó + oka (house).
  • From carioca, the name of an old indigenous tribe.[2]
  • From carii, another indigenous tribe, carii + oka (house).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

carioca m, f (plural cariocas)

  1. an inhabitant of the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
    Os cariocas apreciam a praia de Copacabana.
    The inhabitants of Rio enjoy the beach of Copacabana.

NounEdit

carioca m (plural cariocas)

  1. weak coffee (with added hot water or from a second shot of spent espresso)

Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

carioca m or f (plural cariocas, comparable)

  1. of, from or relating to the city of Rio de Janeiro

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 A. B. H. Ferreira, Novo Dicionário da Língua Portuguesa, second edition (Rio de Janeiro: Nova Fronteira, 1986), page 353
  2. ^ FREIRE, Felisbello. Historia Territorial do Brazil. Rio de Janeiro: Jornal do Commercio, vol. 1 (Bahia, Sergipe e Espirito Santo), 1906, p. 153

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

carioca (plural cariocas)

  1. of, from or relating to the city of Rio de Janeiro

NounEdit

carioca m or f (plural cariocas)

  1. an inhabitant of the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil